My Plantcentric Journey

Posts tagged ‘Dr. McDougall’

Misleading Research

Responses to the new Mediterranean Diet study from Dr. Esselstyn, Dr. T. Colin Campbell and Dr. McDougall http://heartattackproof.com/spanish_study.htm

Interview and Giveaway! Happy Herbivore, Lindsay S. Nixon, Answers All My Questions!

HHA_31DaysofGiveaways_badgeI had an extraordinary opportunity to interview (and offer a great giveaway – more about that at the end of this post!) the Happy Herbivore herself, Lindsay S. Nixon.  You may know her from her blog, www.happyherbivore.com, or her cookbooks The Happy Herbivore Cookbook and Everyday Happy Herbivore.  Her work has been praised and endorsed by notable leaders in the plant-based movement such as Dr. T. Colin Campbell, Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Dr. Neal Barnard, and Dr. John McDougall.

She has just come out with her 3rd cookbook, Happy Herbivore Abroad, A Travelogue & Over 135 Fat-Free & Low-Fat Vegan Recipes From Around the World.   Recipes Made with Everyday Ingredients.  She has lived in eight states, visited 46, spent a year as an expat on a Caribbean island, and traveled to more than 35 places abroad.

HappyHerbivoreAbroad_FrontCover

I really love this cookbook for so many reasons.  A big thing is that I didn’t need to buy 15 different ingredients for each recipe.  Remember, the cover promises everyday ingredients.  I found that I only needed to get 1 or 2 for each.  The ingredient lists are short and the recipes easy.  I really loved reading the little stories about each recipe, where she was, who she met.  I sat down and read this book cover-to-cover.  Great color photos of her travels are included as well.

~

The Interview:

Laura Arnold:  Let me introduce myself. I’m Laura Arnold, and I write the health/nutrition blog www.itsadecision.com. My Twitter account is @Plantcentric. I’ve lost about 100 lbs and follow Dr. Esselstyn’s no added oil, vegan, clean whole foods diet. I also follow Dr. Robert Lustig’s The Bitter Truth of Sugar, so I don’t add sugar. I believe that food is medicine. My followers are health conscious vegans, health institutes, and animal lovers. My hope is to build an entire community of bloggers and health experts that I highlight, sharing content and elevating each of our respective causes and readership together. I view my blog to be like Huffington Post or Drudge Report of health and nutrition, where the reader comes to read lots of different ideas from different bloggers and then can go to that blog to follow-up and learn more about the blogger. Please feel free to read my story in the About section on my blog.

Here are my questions for you:

1.Like so many, you became vegan due to a health scare,and now when you go for your check-ups, the doctor and staff can’t believe what your numbers are and want to show everyone! I ask my readers, “Why wait? Why wait until you’re sick to change your lifestyle?” How do you get that message out? Do you think it’s working?

Lindsay Nixon:  I’m a big believer in leading by example.

Laura:  2. I love that your parents have gone vegan. Reading about them and their adventures is so much fun. They are so cute! I give them so much credit. That’s my favorite part of your blog. You are blessed to have your family change right along with you. Whenever I go to my family’s, I have to bring all my own food. There is very rarely anything, other than maybe a veggie plate, that I can have. How did that change happen for your family?

Lindsay:  My husband sort of found his own way to a plant-based diet. My sister, she had severe allergies and no medications were working. I convinced her to try being plant-based for a few weeks “just to see” and it worked. She was an insta-convert after that. As for my parents, my Dad had a heart attack. The next day he went plant-based and my mom did too.

Laura:  3. How did you go from being a lawyer to cooking? Did your parents think you’d lost your marbles?

Lindsay:  I started blogging in 2007, when I was still in law school. It was a creative outlet for me. Even after I’d graduated and taken the bar exam, blogging continued to be my hobby. As time wore on I realized I liked blogging and cooking way more than I liked being a lawyer, but my hands were tied… until I had the opportunity to write my first cookbook.

I knew there was no way I could work as a lawyer AND write a cookbook, so it was one or the other. I decided to take a big chance, quit being a lawyer and work on my cookbook while also doing various freelance assignments to pay the bills. My husband and I also had to do some major downsizing to make it happen — selling our cars, moving from a large apartment to a teeny, tiny studio, etc. (I’m so glad he was up for it!)

In the end, it all worked out — with an insane amount of hard work 🙂

Lindsay Nixon headshot1

Laura:  4. So many times when I read a vegan cookbook, the recipes liberally use oil. You don’t use any added oil. Your cookbook is sorely needed. Do you find that you are constantly having to explain why no oil even more than why no animal products?

Lindsay:  I explain why I don’t use oil or animal products in the front of all my cookbooks, so if anyone was curious why, they have the information right there. Most of my fans and supporters like that I don’t use animal products or oil, so it’s not an issue.

Laura:  5. Your new book, Happy Herbivore Abroad, is coming out December 4. Congratulations! You may find this surprising, but I had never tried Indian food until last year, and I’m 50! I wanted to go out to a nice dinner for my birthday, and Indian restaurants were the only ones that I could find that had a vegetarian section on their menu! I can’t be the only one that this has happened to, so you could say that a whole new group of people are going to be open to making international, no oil, vegan recipes that never were before. Are these recipes using easy to find ingredients and easy to follow? What countries are represented?

Lindsay:  Yes. I focus on easy, no fuss recipes with everyday ingredients.

So many countries are included, I couldn’t list them all 🙂

~

Thank you so much, Lindsay.  Now to the GIVEAWAY:  In the comment section below, tell me which post on www.itsadecision.com has helped you the most.  The winner will receive a copy of Lindsay’s brand new cookbook Happy Herbivore Abroad!

Good Luck!

Free McDougall Program: Successfully change your diet & lifestyle quickly regain your lost health & appearance.

Get the whole program here for free:  http://www.drmcdougall.com/free.html

Eating Out I Dr. John McDougall

 

 

http://drmcdougall.com/video/mcdougalls_moments_eating_out.html

Heart Surgeons Kill First Man on the Moon: Neil Armstrong

This Tragic Loss Should Become One Giant Leap for Mankind

Neil Armstrong, who made the “giant leap for mankind” as the first human to set foot on the moon, died on Saturday, August 25, 2012. The cause of death according to his family was “complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures.” He had just celebrated his 82nd birthday when he went to the hospital on Monday, August 6, 2012 for a cardiac stress test. He flunked, and on Tuesday surgeons bypassed four blockages in his coronary arteries. This limited information from the media is enough for me to conclude that his death was avoidable; he should have never been operated on. His doctors gambled and we lost an American hero.

The first successful bypass operation was performed in America at the Cleveland Clinic on May 9, 1967, about two years before Mr. Armstrong’s history-making step on the moon on July 20, 1969. Until the mid-1980s, octogenarians (people in their eighties) were spared from heart bypass surgery because the elderly are generally less able to withstand the rigors of extracorporeal circulation (the heart-lung machine) and the many hours of major surgery, than are younger patients. Plus, the life expectancy of people having reached the age of 80 years is limited. Yet, there is the economic side of this equation: doctors and hospitals have increasingly appreciated the market potential of this age group and as a result, have published multiple papers in an attempt to justify taking extreme risks with the elderly.

Open Heart Surgery Does Not Save Lives

There are two indications for heart surgery:

1) To relieve incapacitating chest pain (angina) that is not sufficiently reduced by “good medical therapy.” In standard medical practice, this means giving anti-angina medications like nitrates and beta-blockers. But truly “good medical therapy” must also routinely include a low-fat diet since the frequency of angina episodes is reduced by more than 90% in fewer than three weeks with this simple, safe approach. As an added benefit, this same low-fat diet heals (reverses) the underlying artery disease. A symptom-relieving indication for heart surgery appears to be absent in Mr. Armstrong’s case. He simply had the misfortune to step on a cardiac treadmill machine as part of a routine check up.

2) To save lives. According to the article “Is Heart Surgery Worth It?” in Bloomberg Businessweek, “Except in a minority of patients with severe disease, bypass operations don’t prolong life or prevent future heart attacks,” Even after massaging the data, the survival benefits are barely perceptible: A recent analysis of 28 studies comparing heart surgery with medical therapy, performed by doctors with a vested interest (cardiologists and bypass surgeons), found less than a 2% absolute improvement in survival achieved from heart surgery over no operation. These conclusions are based on relatively young patients. Sadly, the case for octogenarians is much more disappointing.

Multiple studies, performed by researchers, most interested in justifying bypass surgery, have confirmed the higher risks of complications (bleeding, kidney failure, etc.), death, and prolonged hospitalization in octogenarians. An octogenarians’ 30-daymortality rate is 9% compared to 1.2% in the younger group. Surgeons from the same city where Mr. Armstrong died, Cincinnati, know these dismal results as well. J. Michael Smith, M.D., director of surgical research, Good Samaritan Hospital, wrote about his study, “Octogenarians had a 72 percent higher risk of death, 3 percent longer hospitalization, a 51 percent higher risk for neurological complications and were 49 percent more likely to undergo repeat surgery for bleeding…. On the plus side, surgery can improve quality of life, including such symptoms as shortness of breath and chest pain, even in octogenarians. On the other hand, it’s hard to make the argument that you will prolong anyone’s life this way.”

The reason heart surgery (both bypass surgery and angioplasty) fails to save lives is that the targets of the operators are the hard, fibrous, stable, non-lethal plaques, not the volatile small plaques found inside the arteries that rupture and cause heart attacks and death.

Good Can Come from a Hero’s Death

From all accounts Neal Armstrong was strong and healthy with many good years ahead for him. That is before he stepped on the treadmill, which in his case served as the conveyor belt to the operating room, and beyond. His former doctors undoubtedly have regret for their decisions, but not enough to change their ways. They owe the world an explanation for their actions in light of common knowledge held for more than two decades about the extreme risks of lucrative heart surgery in octogenarians. Likely, they will remain silent, continuing to make obscene profits at all costs. (The average annual salary of a bypass surgeon is $533,084.) Let’s hope that this one small step for (a) man will become one giant leap for mankind by publicizing this kind of unconscionable care. No one is immune from these everyday medical practices as Neil Armstrong’s untimely end demonstrates. And let’s dream beyond the moon, hoping that someday soon patients will be offered a time-honored, safe, cost-free, highly effective dietary approach to their health problems.

(Although the kind of stress test used for Neil Armstrong was not identified, the use of a walking treadmill to stress the heart is most commonly employed. If positive, then an angiogram is performed to identify the anatomy of the specific blockages. The angiogram serves as a preoperative test.)

http://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2012nl/aug/armstrong.htm

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: