My Plantcentric Journey

Posts tagged ‘hemp seeds’

Sources of Iron and Omega 3 Fatty Acids for Vegans Are Plentiful

LORI

One of our Twitter friends recently asked the following question:

To @thisdishisveg if you could also include some great ideas for iron and omega 3? I eat fish because when i was full veg. i’d get dizzy a lot.

Great question!

Consuming adequate amounts of iron and omega 3 fatty acids are both very important factors in maintaining optimum health. Luckily, they are both abundant in many plant foods.

Iron is a nutrient that should be paid some attention when transitioning to a plant diet based diet. It is an essential nutrient, as it assists our blood in carrying oxygen via hemoglobin. This is why a lack of iron can certainly make you feel tired or dizzy! There are 2 kinds of iron: heme and non-heme. Heme iron is better absorbed by the body, but it is found only in animal products, and makes up about 40% of their iron content. Non-heme, though absorbed less readily, is abundant in all plant food sources. This absorption issue is why the iron requirement is higher for vegans than for meat eaters. The good news is that a well balanced vegan diet will provide you ample intake, and absorption, of iron.

Leafy greens are one of the best sources of iron. Prime sources are kale, parsley, collard greens, mustard greens, and turnip greens. Other vegetables high in iron are asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, watercress, and brussel sprouts. Although they are high in iron content, spinach and chard are NOT good sources of iron because they contain oxalic acid. Oxalic acid is a substance that binds with iron and inhibits its absorption. However, it’s okay to eat these greens in moderation, as long as you are not relying on them as your iron source.

Some iron rich fruits are mulberries, cherries, apricots, figs, raisins, and dates. Seeds can also be a very high source of iron, the most iron rich being pumpkin seeds. Other seeds to include in your diet are sesame seeds and sunflower seeds. Grains to look for are quinoa and millet. Legumes such as black-eyed peas, lentils, kidney beans, lima beans, and chickpeas are also effective sources. And don’t forget about almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pine nuts and pistachios. Tofu and soy are also good sources, and many dairy free milks are often fortified with iron. Blackstrap molasses is a very rich source as well.

When considering iron, it’s important to understand that vitamin C helps your body absorb iron from food. This is especially noteworthy when eating foods that contain non-heme iron. Fortunately, many vegetables that are high in iron are also high in vitamin C, such as broccoli and bok choy. Another way to increase your iron absorption is through conscious food choices and food combining. Eating beans with tomatoes, for example, will increase your iron uptake due to the high Vitamin C in tomatoes. Hummus is an excellent choice because it combines iron rich chickpeas with the high vitamin C content of lemons! Other foods high in vitamin C are potatoes, kale, brussels sprouts, peppers and many fruits.

You should take caution to avoid consuming tea, coffee and/or calcium supplements during an iron rich meal. Both calcium and tannins (tannins are found in tea and coffee) reduce iron absorption. They should be ingested at least a few hours before or after an iron rich meal. With all the foods mentioned, it is best to eat them in their RAW form, or as close to raw as possible, in order to achieve maximum benefit.

Omega 3 fatty acids are very important for inflammation control. Our bodies need a balance of omega 3 to omega 6 fatty acids. Unfortunately, many of us consume foods that are high in omega 6, and not enough omega 3, leading to inflammation. As for omega 3 plant food sources, I have a personal favorite… chi-chi-CHIA! Who remembers those old commercials where you sprinkle the seeds on your Chia Pet and it grows into a fun little plant?! Those silly little seeds are actually nutritional powerhouses! In addition to being a potent source of omega 3s, chia seeds are high in calcium, protein, fiber, and act as blood sugar stabilizers by slowing down the conversion of carbohydrates into sugars. Chia seeds are hydrophilic (water loving) and will quickly absorb liquid if they are immersed in it. An easy way to to incorporate these little seeds into your diet is to simply add them to your smoothies, or stir them into your oatmeal. For a creative way to eat them, try making a ‘pudding’ by letting about a tablespoon of chia seeds sit in a cup coconut milk. Chill this mixture for about 15 minutes, and you will have a tapioca-like pudding that is delicious!

Other excellent sources of omega 3s are flax oil, walnuts, hemp seeds, and soybeans. I like to add hemp seeds to my smoothies, as they give it a sweet flavor. Hemp seeds also taste great sprinkled on steamed broccoli, and flax oil can be drizzled over any veggies, warm or cold, for an omega 3 boost. Just be sure not to heat your flax oil as this will denature it.

Trying to break down the nutritional contents of foods can be exhausting, but it is important to have a good understanding if you are new to (or experimenting with) a plant based diet, so that you can be certain you are obtaining adequate nutrition. I encourage anyone making changes in their diet to do so carefully, and under the supervision of a professional if further education is needed. However, once you learn the ropes you will see that the key to a healthy, nutrient rich diet is simply eating a wide variety of whole foods! It’s not complicated… in fact, it’s as easy as pie (vegan pie, that is)!

Lori Zito | @LoriZito
Lori is an animal-loving, life-loving vegan who is passionate about spreading the message of better health through a vegan diet. She works as a certified holistic health and nutrition coach, a yoga instructor, and a physical therapist. Learn more at her website Live In The Balance and follow her on Facebook.

Photo Credit: cc: flickr.com/photos/83096974@N00

http://www.thisdishisvegetarian.com/2010/08/sources-of-iron-and-omega-3-fatty-acids.html

6 Types of Seeds to Add to Your Diet

Nuts get lots of attention when we talk about foods that pack a big nutritional punch. However, seeds bring equally big nutritional benefits to the table. Take a look at the list below and you’ll see what I mean. Try adding a handful of these seeds to your oatmeal or yogurt, or just eat ’em on their own to tap into the benefits!

  • hemp-seeds-foar296.jpgSunflower seeds: Sunflower seeds are the food with the highest natural content of vitamin E. Not only is vitamin E an important antioxidant for your skin and keeping you looking young, it is also important for a healthy heart. Sprinkle a couple of tablespoons of sunflower seeds over your slaw or salad for instant crunch and flavor.
  • Flax seeds: Flax seeds contain important omega-3 fatty acids, which promote heart and brain health. However, the seeds need to be ground in order for you to get these benefits. Buy them pre-ground or run them through a coffee grinder and add two tablespoons of the ground seeds to your morning smoothie or yogurt.
  • Hemp seeds: Hemp seeds are a great source of protein and they contain omega-3 fatty acids. You can enjoy hemp seeds whole. Try them sprinkled over fresh fruit to add some crunchy texture.
  • Chia seeds: These small seeds (pictured above) provide fiber and omega-3, 6 and 9 fatty acids. In addition to that, they provide iron and calcium. The best way to add them to your diet is by stirring 1-2 tablespoons into water or your favorite beverage for 3-5 minutes, then enjoying.
  • Pumpkin seeds: Enjoy roasted pumpkin seeds on their own to get in a good source of iron and zinc, nutrients important for maintaining energy levels and supporting the immune system.
  • Sesame seeds: You may have only thought of these seeds as a garnish for a hamburger bun in the past, but sesame seeds are actually a good source of calcium, copper and manganese. The last two are important for regulating your body’s functions and helping with nutrient absorption. Toast a couple of tablespoons in a dry skillet over medium heat until fragrant and add to your favorite stir-fry to get these benefits.

posted by Sarah-Jane Bedwell

http://www.self.com/fooddiet/blogs/eatlikeme/2012/08/six-nutrient-rich-seeds.html?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews&mobify=0

THE BEST RAW VEGAN PLANT BASED PROTEIN SOURCES ON THE PLANET

The Best Raw Vegan Plant Based Protein Sources on the Planet

Woman Running on Beach

Could there be a greater controversy in the health realm than the vegan vs. omnivore debate over protein? If you’ve been living a plant based lifestyle for a while now, you probably chuckle when someone makes a comment like “there’s no way you can get enough protein from vegetables”, or the alternative, you might get a little bit annoyed after hearing it for the 100th time. But let’s face it, there’s a ton of confusion surrounding what we should eat in the world, and some of us have been downright convinced that vegetables are nothing more than water.

My intention is to show what’s possible if you’re choosing to go plant based and opt out of animal protein, for whatever reason. Maybe you’re hoping to heal a dis-ease or health condition, lower your blood pressure, lose weight or increase your energy. These are all common reasons for choosing plants over flesh. But before we get into it, let me be clear that this post is in no way pushing plant based living as the only way to live. In this world, we must live according to our individual paths, and for some of us that means consuming animal flesh and for others it means consuming plants.

My greatest concern when it comes to consuming animals, is the disregard we’ve developed for the animals life, the abuse and suffering that goes on in factory farms, and the inevitable consequences on our bodies when we consume the stress, hormones, anti-biotics and fear based energy of those animals. I could go deeper into why some animal products don’t contribute to healthful living, but this post isn’t about that. For a lot people living in modern urban areas, hunting for food or purchasing from a local organic farmer is not an option. This is a problem, and the solution is going plant based. It’s far safer for you to consume a plant based diet, than to consume factory farmed meat, eggs, milk or dairy.

So What Are Some Reliable Plant Based Protein Sources?

Sprouts

  • Sprouts of all kinds are nutritional powerhouses with a high protein content ranging from 20-35% protein. Not only that, but they’re also excellent sources of nutrients, vitamins and minerals.
  • Broccoli sprouts contain 35% protein
  • Pea Sprouts contain 25% protein

Bunch of Pea Sprouts

Bunch of Pea Sprouts

Greens

  • Dark Green Vegetables will serve your protein needs and provide your body with calcium, chlorophyll, vitamins, minerals and amino acids
  • Broccoli contains 45% protein
  • Spinach contains 30% protein
  • Kale contains 45% protein

Green Kale

Green Kale

Nuts & Seeds

  • Nuts & Seeds are also sources of good healthy fats like omega 3, 6 & 9′s. There is a concern however surrounding the overconsumption of omega 6′s and not getting enough 3′s. For this reason, eating nuts and seeds as part of a raw, vegan or vegetarian diet shouldn’t be considered the main protein source but used in addition to other foods with a lower fat content like sprouts & green vegetables.
  • Hemp Seeds are the only food known to have a perfect harmony of omegas 3,6 & 9. They’re also 22% protein.
  • Pumpkin seeds are 21% protein.
  • Almonds are 12% protein per ounce.

Hemp Seeds

Hemp Seeds

Algae sources

  • Spirulina is about 68% protein and also helps detoxify the body. It’s packed with vitamins and contains EFA’s (essential fatty acids).
  • Chlorella is about 60% protein and is known for it’s rapid tissue repair properties. It’s a great food if you’re very physically active or have higher protein requirements. Use it in your shakes to help speed up recovery times.

Spirulina Powder

Spirulina Powder

Gabriel Cousens discussed the use of spirulina and chlorella for protein supplementation in an interview with Dr. Mercola. He gave an example of someone who wanted to consume 45g of protein per day (which is almost twice as high as what the American Nutritional Journals and World Health Organization recommend). If you were to consume 2 tbsp. of spirulina or chlorella with each meal (let’s say in a juice or smoothie), you would easily hit this mark for protein.

Our Protein Powder of Choice

Sunwarrior Raw Vegan Protein

Sunwarrior Raw Vegan Protein

Visual Examples of Fit, Muscular Vegans

I’m excited to share these examples of super fit, muscular looking vegans that Caleb and I have come across in our googling adventures. Since coming across these amazing examples, we’ve begun to connect with some of them as well so we can continue to give you insight into what their diets and lifestlyes really look like. Stick around to watch this protein discussion evolve in the very near future.

Click here to an interview with Frank and CutandJacked.com

Vegan Bodybuilder Frank Medrano

Vegan Bodybuilder Frank Medrano

Click here to read an interview with Marzia Prince and SimplyShredded.com

Female Vegan Bodybuilder Marzia Prince

Female Vegan Bodybuilder Marzia Prince

Ultimately, it comes down to personal choice. There are many different lifestyles you can follow, some will make you look really good and fail you when it comes to nutrition, and some will serve you not only through physical results, but through internal results.

A plant based lifestyle can provide a host of benefits, many of which I touched on already and in aprevious post on protein. Some people will be quick to judge and say this cannot be true, but those same people have likely never tried a vegetarian diet, let alone a raw vegan diet. When we open our mind up to possibilities, we gift ourselves the chance to experience optimal health, whatever that looks like for us. The key is to be open to experimentation. If your current lifestyle isn’t working for you, considering giving a plant based lifestyle an honest shot. Even a 7 day trial is a great place to start!

I’d love to hear some of your favourite protein sources in the comments below!

Learn how to integrate raw foods into your lifestyle in our 3 months course How to Go Raw, Not Crazy!We’re taking a few more student testers, if you’d like more details on how you can get a discount on registration you can  email us with the subject line “how to go raw”.

AUTHOR:Sheleana Breakell -Young and Raw

Sheleana is the co-founder & chief blogger of YoungandRaw.com, a self taught raw vegan chef and big time animal lover. Like many, her path to a high raw and plant based lifestyle came through a series of challenges and discoveries. After healing her body and spirit of chronic fatigue, hormonal imbalance and shedding over 45lbs of weight through raw foods, Sheleana was inspired to help other people take their power back and re-build more sustainable relationships with the food they eat. As the author and co-creator of a 3 month raw food program for beginners called How to Go Raw, Not Crazy! She and her partner Caleb take students on a journey of self discovery, raw food preparation, meal planning, weight loss and conquering cravings. Rather than suggesting everyone be a raw vegan, she simply chooses to share the information that resonates with her at her core in hopes that it will reach the people who are meant to receive it. There is never any pressure to adopt a certain diet or lifestyle 100%. Sheleana is a free spirit and fully embraces all aspects of life’s’ challenges as lessons and opportunities for growth. She knows everyone is on their own journey and what works for her may not work for others. The Young and Raw philosophy is based on unconditional love, self awareness, compassion for all life and radical authenticity.

7 Top Sources of Plant-Based Protein

My Top 7 Sources of Plant-Based Protein

I say it all the time. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not only possible to optimize your health on a plant-based diet; when done right, I actually recommend it.
But where do you get your protein?
I field this question constantly. Despite deeply ingrained but misleading conventional wisdom, the truth is that you can survive without meat, eggs and dairy. Believe it or not, you can actually thrive, and never suffer a protein deficiency. Because no matter how active your lifestyle, a well-roundedwhole food plant-based diet provides more than enough protein to satisfy the body’s needs without all the artery-clogging saturated fats that dominate the typical American diet.
I speak from experience. As a vegan endurance athlete, I place a high tax on my body. And yet my plant-based diet has fueled me for years without any negative impact on building lean muscle mass or recovery. In fact, at age 45 I continue to improve and am as fit, healthy, and strong as I have ever been.
Here’s a list of my top-7 plant-based foods high in protein:
 
1. Quinoa: 11g Protein / Cup
A grain like seed, quinoa is a high protein alternative to rice or pasta, served alone or over vegetables and greens. It provides a good base for a veggie burger and is also a fantastic breakfast cereal when served cold with almond or coconut milk and berries.
2. Lentils: 17.9g  Protein / Cup
Delicious, nutritious and super easy to prepare. Trader Joe’s sells them pre-cooked and I’m not afraid to just eat them cold right out of the package for lunch or a snack on the run.
3. Tempeh: 24g Protein / 4 Ounces
A fermented soybean-based food, tempeh is a healthy protein-packed alternative to it’s non-fermented cousin tofu. It makes for a great veggie burger and doubles as a tasty meat alternative to meatballs in pasta, or over brown rice and vegetables.
4. Seitan: 24g Protein / 4 Ounces
An excellent substitute for beef, fish and soy products, one serving provides about 25% of your RDA of protein. But not for those with gluten sensitivities, as it is made from wheat gluten.
5. Beans (Black, Kidney, Mung, Pinto): 12-15g Protein / Cup
I love beans. Great on a veggie burrito, in chili and soups, on salads or over rice with vegetables, beans of all varieties are a daily staple of my diet.
6. Spirulina: 6g Protein / 10 grams
A blue-green algae, spirulina is a highly bioavailable complete protein containing all essential amino acids. At 60% protein (the highest of any natural food), it’s a plant-based protein powerhouse that finds it way into my Vitamix blends daily.
7. Hemp Seeds: 16g Protein / 3 Tbsp
With a perfect ration of omega-6 and omega-3 EFA’s, hemp seeds are another bioavailable complete protein rivaled only by spirulina. A simple and great addition to a multitude of dishes, from breakfast cereal to salads to smoothies to vegetables and rice.
Bonus: Here’s a little inspirational video!

Published April 11, 2012 at 4:45 PM
About Rich Roll

Rich is a two-time top finisher at the Ultraman World Championships and in 2010 was the first person (along with colleague Jason Lester) to complete EPIC5 – 5 ironman-distance triathlons on 5 Hawaiian Islands in under a week.
His inspirational memoir FINDING ULTRA: Rejecting Middle Age, Becoming One of the World’s Fittest Men, and Discovering Myself (Crown / Random House) hits bookshelves May 22, 2012 and is currently available for pre-order.
For more on how Rich fuels his family and training, check out his and his wife Julie’s plant-based e-cookbook JAI SEED – a beautiful coffee-table style cookbook for the digital iPad set that contains 77 glossy pages of plant-based nutrition information and easy to prepare recipes certain to satisfy even the most finicky family member.
Follow Rich on FacebookTwitter or at RichRoll.com

How to Meet Your Protein Needs without Meat

How to Meet Your Protein Needs without Meat

A Guide to Vegetarian Protein Sources

— By Sarah Haan, Registered Dietitian and Nicole Nichols, Health Educator
SparkPeople advertisers help keep the site free! Learn more

Eating a vegetarian diet can be very healthful and rewarding. However, most vegetarians—including soon-to-be vegetarians and their meat-eating loved ones—are concerned about getting adequate protein. Most people are accustomed to getting protein from meat, but what else contains protein? Aren’t plant-based proteins “incomplete” or lower quality?Fortunately, with a bit of extra attention, you won’t have any trouble meeting your protein needs just because you give up meat. There are so many protein-packed vegetarian options! Did you know that most foods, including vegetables, have some of the essential muscle-building nutrient? Without looking closely, it is easy to miss some great sources. (Who knew a cup of broccoli had 3 grams!)Nuts, seeds, soy products, cereal, eggs and dairy are all good meatless protein choices. These groups of food each contain different amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and different levels of protein quality. There is no need to consume certain foods in special combinations as nutritionists once thought! When your diet includes a variety of each of these types of foods, you can rest assured that you’re consuming all the amino acids you need for muscle growth and cell repair.

Nuts
Nuts provide a good dose of protein along with some heart-healthy fatty acids and antioxidants (vitamins A and E). They are also packed full of fiber. Take your pick! Many nuts have a significant source of protein ready to work for your body. Peanuts, almonds, pistachios, cashews, and pine nuts are among the highest in protein, while chestnuts and hazelnuts, although they do still have some protein, are the lowest. Think out of the box when you’re adding nuts to your diet. They can be grated, toasted, ground or eaten raw and are great when combined with salads, wraps, soups and stews and baked goods. But pay special attention to portion size! Nuts are a great source of many nutrients, but do come with a hefty dose of calories, thanks to the healthy fats they contain. A single serving is just 1 oz! Many nuts are best when stored in a refrigerator, which helps keep their fats from going rancid (for up to 6 months).

Nuts, 1/4 cup Protein Calories Fat
Peanuts, raw 9 g 207 18 g
Almonds, dry roasted 8 g 206 18 g
Pistachios 6 g 171 14 g
Hazelnuts 5 g 212 21 g
Pine nuts 5 g 229 23 g
Cashews, raw 5 g 197 16 g
Walnuts 4 g 164 16 g

Seeds
Seeds are another great way to grab a few grams of protein and many other nutrients. Healthful unsaturated fats, as well as phytochemicals, make seeds a powerhouse for heart disease and cancer prevention. Just a quarter cup of pumpkin seeds (also called pepitas) has 8.5 grams of protein. Add this amount to a salad or eat them plain for a quick snack. Sunflower seeds are easy to add to pasta or salads, or sandwich wraps, while sesame seeds are easily ground and sprinkled onto steamed veggies for a protein dusting.

Seeds (1/4 cup) Protein Calories Fat
Hemp seeds 15 g 232 18 g
Pumpkin seeds, roasted 9 g 187 16 g
Flaxseed 8 g 191 13 g
Sunflower seeds, roasted 8 g 205 18 g
Sesame seeds, roasted 6 g 206 18 g

Legumes
Dried peas, beans and lentils belong to a group of food known as “pulses” or “legumes.” Aside from soybeans, these plants have a very similar nutrient content, which includes a good dose of protein. On average, they have about 15 grams of protein per cup, and tagging along with the essentials protein are fiber and iron. Adding beans, lentils and dried peas to your meals is a great way to replace meat (a beef burrito can easily become a black bean burrito, for example) while still getting your much needed protein. Add pulses to soups, salads, omelets, burritos, casseroles, pasta dishes, and more! Make bean dips (such as hummus, which is made from garbanzo beans, or black bean dip) to spread on sandwiches and use as protein-packed dips for veggies or snack foods.

Legumes, 1 cup cooked Protein Calories Fiber
Soybeans 29 g 298 10 g
Lentils 18 g 230 16 g
Split peas 16 g 231 16 g
Navy beans 16 g 258 12 g
Garbanzo beans (chickpeas) 15 g 269 12 g
Black beans 15 g 227 15 g
Kidney beans 15 g 225 11 g
Lima beans 15 g 216 13 g
Pinto beans 14 g 234 15 g

Soy
Soybeans are a complete protein that is comparable in quality with animal proteins. Eating soybeans (and foods made from soybeans) has been growing trend in America for only five decades, but this protein-rich bean has been a staple in Asia for nearly 4,000 years! This plant powerhouse is used to create a variety of soy-based foods that are rich in protein: tofu, tempeh, textured vegetable protein (TVP, a convincing replacement for ground meat in recipes), soymilk and “meat analogs,” such as vegetarian “chicken” or faux “ribs” are all becoming more popular as more Americans practice vegetarianism. To learn more about using tofu, read Tofu 101. To learn how soy may impact your health, click here.

Soy Foods Protein Calories Fat
Soybeans, 1 cup cooked 29 g 298 10 g
Tempeh, 4 oz cooked 21 g 223 13 g
Edamame, 1 cup shelled 20 g 240 10 g
TVP, 1/4 cup dry 12 g 80 0 g
Soy nuts, 1/4 cup roasted 11 g 200 1 g
Tofu, 4 oz raw 9 g 86 5 g
Soy nut butter, 2 tablespoons 7 g 170 11 g
Soymilk, 1 cup sweetened 7 g 100 0.5 g
Soymilk, 1 cup unsweetened 7 g 80 0.5 g

Grains
In a culture that focuses largely on wheat, it’s easy to overlook the many types of other grains available to us. Some of these grains are very high in protein and can be included in your diet for both whole-grain carbohydrates and muscle-building protein. Quinoa is unusually close to animal products in protein quality, making it an excellent grain to replace white rice or couscous. It can also be cooked and mixed with honey, berries and almonds in the morning for a protein-packed breakfast. Other grains high in protein include spelt, amaranth, oats and buckwheat. Choose whole-grain varieties of cereals, pastas, breads and rice for a more nutritious meal.

Grains Protein Calories Fiber
Amaranth, 1 cup cooked 9 g 238 9 g
Quinoa, 1 cup cooked 9 g 254 4 g
Whole wheat pasta, 1 cup cooked 8 g 174 6 g
Barley, 1 cup cooked 7 g 270 14 g
Spelt, 4 oz cooked 6 g 144 4 g
Oats, 1 cup cooked 6 g 147 4 g
Bulgur, 1 cup cooked 6 g 151 8 g
Buckwheat, 1 cup cooked 6 g 155 5 g
Brown rice, 1 cup cooked 5 g 216 4 g
Whole wheat bread, 1 slice 4 g 128 3 g
Sprouted grain bread, 1 slice 4 g 80 3 g

Dairy
If you consume milk products, dairy is a great way to add some extra grams of protein to your day. Low-fat milk, cheese and yogurt are easily accessible, quick to pack and fun to incorporate into many meals and snacks. Whether you’re drinking a cup of skim milk with your dinner or grabbing some string cheese before you run errands, you can pack about 8 grams of protein into most servings of dairy. You’re also getting some bone-building calcium while you’re at it! Keep in mind that low-fat varieties of milk products are lower in calories and fat, but equal in calcium to the full-fat versions; low-fat varieties may also be higher in protein.

Dairy Protein Calories Fat
Fat-free cottage cheese, 1 cup 31 g 160 1 g
2% cottage cheese, 1 cup 30 g 203 4 g
1% cottage cheese, 1 cup 28 g 163 2 g
Fat-free plain yogurt, 1 cup 14 g 137 0 g
Low-fat plain yogurt, 1 cup 13 g 155 4 g
Parmesan cheese, 1 oz grated 12 g 129 9 g
Whole milk yogurt, 1 cup 9 g 150 8 g
Goat’s milk, 1 cup 9 g 168 10 g
1% milk, 1 cup 8 g 102 2 g
Swiss cheese, 1 oz 8 g 106 8 g
2% milk, 1 cup 8 g 121 7 g
3.25% (whole) milk, 1 cup 8 g 146 8 g
Low-fat cheddar/Colby cheese, 1 oz 7 g 49 2 g
Part-skim mozzarella cheese, 1 oz 7 g 72 5 g
Provolone cheese, 1 oz 7 g 100 8 g
Cheddar cheese, 1 oz 7 g 114 9 g
Blue cheese, 1 oz 6 g 100 8 g
American cheese, 1 oz 6 g 106 9 g
Goat cheese, 1 oz 5 g 76 6 g
Feta cheese, 1 oz 4 g 75 6 g
Part-skim ricotta cheese, 1 oz 3 g 39 2 g

Eggs
Eggs contain the highest biologic value protein available. What this means is that an egg has a near perfect combination of amino acids within its shell; when assessing protein quality of all other foods (including meat), nutrition experts compare them to the egg. This doesn’t mean that all other sources of protein are less healthful or less important but does mean that an egg is an awesome way to get a few grams of protein. At 6 grams for one large egg, there are endless ways to add it to your diet. Salads, sandwiches, breakfasts or snack—an egg can fit in anytime!

Eggs Protein Calories Fat
Egg, 1 boiled 6 g 68 5 g
Egg white, 1 cooked 5 g 17 0 g
Liquid egg substitute, 1.5 fl oz 5 g 23 0 g

As you can see, protein is EVERYWHERE in our diet, and even without meat you can get enough every day; you just have to look in the right places! For more ideas for using these various plant-based proteins, check out our dailySpark series, Meat-Free Fridays for recipe and cooking ideas!

Selected Sources
Information Sheet: Protein from The Vegetarian Society (VegSoc.org)

Various nutrient profiles from The World’s Healthiest Foods (WHFoods.com)


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About The Author

Sarah HaanSarah Haan
Sarah is a registered dietitian with a bachelor’s degree in dietetics. She helps individuals adopt healthy lifestyles and manage their weight. An avid exerciser and cook, Sarah likes to run, lift weights and eat good food. See all of Sarah’s articles.

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