My Plantcentric Journey

Posts tagged ‘nutritional yeast’

A Serving of Nutritional Yeast, a Cheese-Like Add-on, has an Incredible 9 g of Satiating Protein!

Try it: as a dairy-free sub for Parmesan on popcorn, potatoes, pasta, or scrambled eggs.

Find it: in specialty markets or health-food stores.

 

I get mine at Whole Foods in the bulk section and at Heinen’s http://www.heinens.com .   In the list at the following link, I agree with all except, of course, the kefir because it’s dairy.  Laura

More superfoods with super flavor: Women’s Health http://bit.ly/RWcu8Q

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Anti-Cancer Easy Curry Turmeric Tofu Stir Fry with Fresh Cabbage Recipe

 

We got a couple cabbages and red onions from the stand down the road, and were wondering what to do with them.

I was feeling creative and just made this super filling, super healthy dish.  Cabbage, carrots, squash, onions, tofu, curry, garlic, ginger, turmeric,  and broccoli are cancer fighters straight off Dr. Oz’s Anti-Cancer Shopping List. http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/anti-cancer-shopping-list .

No real measurements.  Just use what you have and add to taste.  What could be easier?

2 portions from bag Normandy Blend frozen vegetables, thawed and microwaved a few minutes

sliced fresh cabbage

diced red onion or an onion

2 servings tofu, organic, non gmo

Vegetable Broth (no salt)

Curry, turmeric, ginger, chopped garlic, freshly ground pepper, cayenne, Nutritional Yeast, Bragg’s Liquid Aminos or low sodium soy sauce non gmo

Pour some veg. broth in bottom of cast iron skillet.  Cooking in cast iron adds iron to your dish.  Heat on med/high.

Cut tofu into 2 slices.  Sprinkle with turmeric and Liquid Aminos.  When broth is hot, add tofu and heat on both sides.  Set aside.

Add onions and cabbage to skillet.  Cook a couple minutes.  Add bag of vegetables, more broth, Liquid Aminos, curry, turmeric, cayenne, freshly ground pepper, ginger.  Cook to desired doneness.

Put tofu slices in bottom of serving dish and heap with vegetables and broth.  The hot veggies and broth will reheat your tofu.  Sprinkle with cayenne & Nutritional yeast.

Serving for 2.

21 Foolproof Vegan Recipe Substitutions

by Mykalee McGowan

21 Vegan Recipe Substitutions

It was once known as the diet of hippies and extreme animal lovers, but not anymore. Veganism is slowly becoming mainstream as professional bodybuilders and celebs from Mike Tyson to Bill Clinton — not to mention some normal folks — transition to the vegan lifestyle.

The vegan diet means eliminating all animal products on the plate. So most vegans steer clear of meat, dairy, eggs, and even honey. Some vegans are motivated by humanitarian concerns, but the vegan diet has some potential health benefits, too, like a reduced risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, and cancer[1]. Still scared to try the V-word? We’ve rounded up 21 delicious substitutions that can help ease the blow.

Meat

1. Tofu (firm or extra firm): One of the most common substitutes for meat, tofu has a light, fluffy texture. Half a cup packs 10 grams of protein, about half the quantity of protein in the same amount of chicken. (So make sure to add some nuts or sesame seeds when replacing meat with tofu.) Tofu stars in a range of dishes, from vegan lasagna to this summer salsa dish, but there are a fewcooking tips to keep in mind to avoid a tasteless meal.

2. Seitan: Made from wheat gluten, seitan has almost as much protein and less fat than the same amount of ground beef. Even though seitan doesn’t pick up flavors as well as tofu, the texture is more meat-like. It’s a great replacement for meat in beef and chicken main dishes — try this veganteriyaki recipe.

3. Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP): TVP doesn’t exactly sound appealing: It’s basically defatted soy flour (meaning the oils were removed during processing) that comes in the form of granules. But a lot of people find TVP quite tasty — and nutritious. It’s not only a good source of protein, but it’s also rich in fiber, a key nutrient for digestive health. And no need to forgo tacos andchili — TVP’s a great substitute for ground beef or ground turkey!

4. TempehTempeh is made from whole soybeans, meaning it has a pretty bumpy texture. The meat substitute is packed with protein (about 15 grams per half-cup serving), fiber, and all sorts ofantioxidants. The next time a BLT craving hits, skip the bacon and opt instead for a “TLT.” (That’stempeh, lettuce, and tomato.)

5. Chickpeas: Also known as Garbanzo beans, chickpeas are rich in protein (12 grams per cup) and folate, important for red blood cell production and proper brain function. Some great vegan chickpea choices include falafel and “Tu-no,” a vegan tuna recipe that may leave you free of the sea forever.

Cheese

6. Nutritional Yeast: Another meat replacement that’s way more appetizing than it sounds,nutritional yeast is a good source of protein and vitamin B12. Plus it’s a good option for those watching their blood pressure, with about 9 mg of sodium per ounce compared to about 428 mg in the same amount of Parmesan cheese. Still dreaming of Parmesan-covered spaghetti? Sprinkle on some nutritional yeast for some cheesy flavor on pastas and in sauces, like mac and cheese!

7. Soy Cheese: For vegan cheese lovers, this food is almost like magic. Soy cheese melts, spreads and tastes like the real thing — without all the saturated fat! Use soy cheese in all traditional cheese dishes, like fancy fondue. But keep in mind soy cheese doesn’t usually provide as much protein or calcium as most types of milk cheese, so add some nuts or another protein source to a cheese-free meal. Abracadabra!

Milk

8. Soy Milk: One of the most common milk substitutes, soy milk is a nutritional superstar. Some brands pack protein, vitamin D, and 15 percent more calcium than skim milk. With its light taste, soy milk can replace cow’s milk in almost any dish — even doughnuts!

9. Rice Milk: Made from the liquid of ground rice, rice milk is a light-tasting, low-cholesterol alternative to cow’s milk, with about the same amount of calcium. Try it chilly in this ice cream recipe.

10. Almond Milk: Compared to cow’s milk, almond milk is about equal in calories and even higher in healthy fats and antioxidants. This thick milk is great for baking goodies, like this marbled banana bread.

11. Hemp Milk: Yes, hemp milk is made from hemp seeds, marijuana’s cousins. But the high we get from drinking this stuff is from the awesome nutrients. Hemp milk is a great source of omega-3fatty acids, which can help reduce inflammation and improve brain function. (But bones, beware: Hemp milk doesn’t have as much calcium as whole milk, so be sure to get extra calcium from othernon-dairy sources.) Pour it on cereal or in a mocha latte for a delicious milk-free delicacy.

12. Oat Milk: Surprised to hear there’s such a thing as milk made with oats? Don’t be. Oat milk can improve hair and skin health and provide a ton of fiber and iron. It’s lighter in taste than cow’s milk, can replace milk in a variety of recipes, and anyone can make it! Try the cashew version for an extra kick.

13. Coconut Milk: Go cuckoo for coconut milk. This low-calorie liquid packs protein plus vitamins and minerals like magnesium, which aids the muscular system. (The only downside is coconut milk doesn’t have quite as much calcium as cow’s milk.) Coconut milk is great in creamy sauces, especially curry sauces.

Eggs

14. Tofu (silken or soft): Just like an egg, tofu is a great source of protein. (A half-cup serving of tofu has 10 grams of protein; one large egg has 6 grams.) Tofu tastes great in heavy egg dishes likequiche and omelets. Or scramble tofu with some veggies for a nutritious breakfast.

15. Apple Sauce: Using unsweetened apple sauce in vegan baked foods is not only a creative way to replace eggs, but also cuts down on cholesterol. Use ¼-cup applesauce for every egg the recipe calls for, like in raspberry truffle brownies.

16. Flax Seeds: When it comes to baking, flax seeds are a great, if unexpected, substitute for eggs. The seeds turn baked goods from sweet treats into awesome sources of Omega-3 fats and fiber. Remember to ground the flax seeds or buy flaxseed meal before baking. (If not, prepare to eat some chunky muffins.) Then give this gingerbread flax muffin recipe a try.

17. Mashed Bananas: An egg and a banana might look pretty different, but they’re both great binding agents (the stuff that holds all the ingredients together). Use mashed banana as an alternative binding agent in different baking recipes for some potassium-rich cakes or chocolate chip muffins.

Butter

18. Coconut Butter: A nutritious, delicious butter alternative, coconut butter has absolutely no cholesterol. (Regular butter has about 33 milligrams per tablespoon.) Coconut butter’s also packed with nutrients that aid in brain function, immunity, and weight loss. Craving chocolate? Try this mouthwatering fudge recipe.

19. Soy Margarine: This spread might as well be called, “I can’t believe it’s not dairy!” Soy margarine’s as versatile as regular butter and tastes strikingly similar. And unlike regular butter, soy margarine contains no whey, lactose, or casein (all animal products). These crepes require soy margarine or another vegan spread. 

Honey

20. Agave Syrup: Even though it’s made from the same plants responsible for tequila, agave syrup won’t give us that happy-hour buzz. Still, as a honey substitute, it doesn’t disappoint. Agave syrup is sweeter than sugar and thinner than honey — but it can also be filled with fructose and calories, so use it sparingly. Agave syrup’s a great sweetener for teas, juices, desserts, anddressings.

21. Maple Syrup: It’s the secret Aunt Jemimah’s kept for too long: Maple syrup is a great alternative to honey. It’s full of antioxidants, zinc, iron and potassium, nutrients that help boost heart health and the immune system. Plus it’s usually lower in sugar and calories than honey. And flapjacks won’t be the only treat doused in sweet goodness: Maple syrup can also replace honey as an oatmeal topping and even sweeten up blueberry pie.

Did we miss any of your favorite vegan products? Let us know in the comments below!

Works Cited

  1. Position of the American Dietetic Association: vegetarian diets. Craig, W.J, Mangels, A.R., American Dietetic Association. Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2009;109(7):1266-82. []

http://greatist.com/health/vegan-recipe-substitutions/?utm_source=pulsenews&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+greatist+%28Greatist+-+Health+and+Fitness+Articles%2C+News%2C+and+Tips%29

Obstacles to Plant-Strong: Middle of Nowhere

Engine 2 Diet: Natala here, today I share about living in the middle of nowhere and staying plant-strong. My husband and I have been traveling for 3 1/2 years now, we’ve lived in towns with 150 people and large cities. We have a pot, a pan, a knife and a spatula (and 2 place settings). We have never had a problem staying plant-strong no matter where we are.

Obstacles to Plant-Strong: Middle of Nowhere

July 31, 2012

You live 4 hours to the closest Whole Foods. The nearest grocery store is 45 minutes, and is not that great. What do you do?

My husband and I have been traveling for 3 1/2 years, full time. We have had no official home base. We have lived in large cities like San Francisco and we’ve lived in tiny cities, the smallest population count was 150. And guess what? We’ve never had a problem eating plant-strong. In fact, oddly enough we tend to have a much easier time the further we are from ‘convenience’ foods.

So how do you become a plant-strong rock-star in the middle of nowhere?

1. Have a good attitude. I get so many e-mails starting out in dispair. “BUUUUTTTTTTTT I can’t do it!!!!! I don’t have a Whole Foods! I don’t have Trader Joes! I don’t have a veg. cafe in my town!”

Now, don’t get me wrong, it’s nice to have those things from time to time. But seriously? Most of our long term studies done on the benefits of plant-based nutrition were in rural China. Guess what? They are really far from Whole Foods. In fact most of the healthiest populations on Earth are more than likely not relying on veg. cafe’s and organic markets.

So chin up! Put your best foot forward and put the excuses and “buts” down.

2. Figure out what your local store does well. So many the fresh produce is nothing to write home about. But maybe they have a great grains, beans and frozen vegetable and fruit selection. Awesome, you have enough to get you going. We have yet to find a store that does not carry non dairy milk, but you really don’t NEED non-dairy milk, you can make oatmeal just fine with water. Rip’s big bowl? You can use water and squeeze some grapefruit juice into it (this is what Rip does in a bind). The other thing – ask your store to carry something. We were in a very small coastal town in North Carolina in the winter, we’re talking BARE BONES, often the employees outnumbered the shoppers by a good number. One day, while talking to one of the cashiers I mentioned Ezekiel bread, she asked her manager and a week later they had Ezekiel bread. Turned out that other people on the tiny coastal town wanted it as well, it became a best seller. It can’t hurt to ask.

3. Join a CSA. If you can join a local CSA, that is great! Better yet, grow your own food! We’ve become so far removed from food, sometimes we forget if we have a yard we can start our own garden. We know not everyone can do this, but if you can, or if you can join together with some friends, it is well worth it. Good news, kale is VERY forgiving.

4. Shop online. My husband and I signed up for Amazon Prime – you get 2 day shipping on pretty much everything and it is really inexpensive (I think 79 dollars for the year). We order a lot, and we usually get it for cheaper prices than we can get at a major chain store. We order Uncle Sam’s, Barbara’s, beans, grains, oats, spices, nutritional yeast and more. Pretty much, if it is dry, we have found it. We have some of our favorite foods in our Amazon store (including some good traveling/camping food options).

5. Eating out. If you have lived in your town for a while, chances are you know the people at the places you eat out. And chances are they have vegetables in the kitchen, the might even have brown rice or potatoes. Go to the manager and tell them your situation, ask them if they could make something for you. We have yet to find a place that wasn’t willing to help us out. We’ve had some of our best meals in tiny places that had nothing on the menu we could eat, however when we asked for something off the menu? We were all set. Remember to leave nice tips and nice yelp reviews for businesses that help you out, they will want to continue to help you out.

6. Get creative, or not. My husband and I structure almost all of our meals the same way: grain/starch, bean, vegetable, leafy green. For breakfast I like oatmeal or quinoa he has a big bowl ever morning. Our lives are much less complicated, but not lacking flavor and we never get bored. We are also big fans of Jeff Novick’s Fast Food DVD and Burgers and Fries DVD. No need for special ingredients or equipment (we have 1 pot, 1 pan and a spatula).

7. Make it simple. Pick 5-6 meals to rotate in and out for a while. When you are tired of those meals, pick 5-6 more meals to rotate in and out. Sometimes we tend to over complicate things. Remember a lot of the healthier societies are mostly surviving on rice and beans and doing well. Part of the problem is that in our over sold to society, we have been introduced to 1000′s of tastes (most not good) we’re constantly looking for substitutes, when what we should be doing is looking for our tastes to change.

8. Start a dinner club. Not everyone in your circle of friends/church group/volunteer group has to be plant-strong do do this. See if your group of friends would be up for a plant-strong meal exchange. Put people ‘in charge’ of different dishes, even if it is just once a month. So someone gets the main dish, someone gets dessert, someone gets a side (and so on) and everyone makes enough for 5 people. You get together and exchange your dishes. Give them the plant-strong guidelines. Who knows, maybe they will all be up for a 28 day challenge! It is a fun way to get your friends involved with healthy eating.

9. Stock up. There have been a few times where my husband and I knew we were going to be a few hours from a grocery store. So we buy some freezer bags, ice and we stock up. We also have a bunch of dried goods sent to us. We did this once for a 2 month stay, and things worked out just fine.

10. Prep ahead. To make things easier for yourself, prep your food ahead of time. Pick a couple of hours on the weekend, get the entire family involved. Chop, dice, mix, stir. Prepare meals, you can freeze almost anything just fine, but for the week most things hold up just fine in the refrigerator.

Bottom line, while living in the middle of nowhere can present its own obstacles, it should not stop you from getting plant-strong!

Do you live in the middle of nowhere? What is your strategy?

Natala Constantine
A few years ago Natala was on almost 15 medications daily, had out of control Type 2 Diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, issues with nerve damage, and was morbidly obese. She decided to take her life back by adopting a plant-based diet, and has since lost over 200 pounds and no longer needs medication. Natala became passionate about nutrition, received her Certificate in Plant-Based Nutrition through Cornell University, and now works with Rip Esselstyn and The Engine 2 Dietteam.

10 Must Have Items for a Perfect Vegan Pantry

I agree with everything except the oils.

By Stephanie Rogers, EcoSalon

Stock up on these 10 basic essentials for your vegan pantry including beans, whole grains, non-dairy milk and a variety of seasonings.

Contrary to the assumptions of many a meat eater, vegans don’t solely subsist on lettuce and carrots. But what, exactly, should be stocked in a vegan’s pantry? Anyone looking to make healthy, nutritious meals that are free of animal products should have a few basic ingredients on hand at all times to provide protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals – and let’s not forget flavor. These 10 pantry essentials make sticking to a vegan diet easy and interesting, from beans and whole grains to truffle oils and agave nectar.

Beans, Tofu, Tempeh and Seitan

If there’s one nutrient that Americans tend to focus on when it comes to healthy diets, it’s protein. But no matter what meat-obsessed fad diets imply, it’s easy to get plenty of protein from vegan sources. Beans and tofu are two lean, cholesterol-free options for protein, and they’re incredibly versatile. Canned beans are convenient, but dried beans are cheaper and don’t come with the risk of hormone-altering BPA in the lining of the can. They simply need to be soaked overnight before cooking, or you can whip them up rapidly with a pressure cooker. Firm tofu can be marinated and tossed into just about any dish, while silken tofu is a nutritious addition to smoothies. Seitan is made from wheat gluten and has a meaty texture reminiscent of chicken, and chewy tempeh is a vegan sandwich staple.

Whole Grains & Flours

The difference between whole grains and refined grains goes beyond increased fiber and nutrients. Whole grains are packed with flavor, which translates into tastier dishes and baked goods. Brown rice, quinoa, amaranth, bulgur, spelt, oats, millet, barley and wild rice are a few examples of whole grains that you can incorporate into your diet, and most of them are available in flour form, too. Flours made from quinoa and oats aren’t just for people avoiding gluten – they impart their own particular flavor and texture to recipes like chocolate amaranth quinoa cake.

Non-Dairy Milks

Who needs cow’s milk when there’s almond milk, rice milk, hemp milk, coconut milk and soy milk? Stock your pantry with your favorite varieties of non-dairy milks, each of which has its own particular flavor and texture. Coconut milk and soy milk tend to be richer and heavier, frothing up a little more for satisfying beverages. Rice milk and almond milk have a natural sweetness, and heart-healthy almond milk is appropriately nutty. Soy milk is the highest in protein, and hemp milk has lots of omega fatty acids. Avoid the flavored varieties to cut unnecessary sugar and calories. You can easily make your own almond milk with nothing more than raw almonds, water and a blender.

A Variety of Oils and Vinegars

No kitchen is complete without extra virgin olive oil and white vinegar, no matter what kind of foods you like to eat. Beyond those two absolute basics is a wide variety of vinegars and oils with all kinds of different uses and characteristics. Vinegars include balsamic, red wine, white wine, apple cider, rice and malt. Coconut oil is great for high-heat cooking and baking, sesame oil has lots of flavor for stir-fries and salads, and truffle oils are a luxurious treat. Try oils and vinegars infused with herbs, garlic, chilies and even fruit, too.

Nuts, Seeds & Butters

Head to the bulk bins at your local natural foods store to stock up on a wide variety of nuts and seeds like almonds, cashews, walnuts, macadamia nuts, sesame seeds, flax seeds, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds. You can actually use cashews, macadamias and other types of nuts to make your own vegan ricotta cheese. And when it comes to nut and seed butters, don’t be afraid to branch out from the standard peanut and almond varieties – try cashew, hazelnut and sesame.

Nutritional Yeast

Missing cheese? Aside from making your own nut-based ricotta, you can add a cheesy flavor to all kinds of foods using nutritional yeast. This inactive yeast is a great source of vitamin B12, which can be difficult for vegans to get from other sources. Light and flaky, it can be added to popcorn as a topping, melted into margarine and/or non-dairy milk for a cheesy sauce or just tossed into any dish you like.

Healthy Condiments

Most condiments are processed junk full of fat, sugar and sodium. But there are some healthy condiments that can add complex flavors to your vegan dishes, elevating a simple meal to the sublime. Mustard, soy sauce, miso and hot sauces add a huge punch of flavor with just a few drops. Bragg’s Liquid Aminos, a great vegan source of amino acids, is a popular way to add a little bit of savory “umami” flavor to any dish. Agave nectar is a popular vegan sweetener, and fruit preserves are almost always free of animal products.

Herbs and Spices

Like condiments, oils and vinegars, herbs and spices simply make everything taste better. If you’re new to cooking and/or using spices, buy a variety and experiment to see what you like. Most herbs, including parsley and basil, are best used fresh, but some – like bay leaves and oregano – retain lots of flavor when dried. Spices, which are usually the dried seeds, bark or buds of plants, tend to stay fragrant a bit longer. Some basics include chili powder, paprika, onion powder, garlic powder, ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, turmeric and black pepper. Dried mushrooms are another delicious source of umami flavor.

Canned Fruits and Vegetables

Canned goods generally aren’t the best when it comes to flavor and texture, with many canned veggies – like green beans – barely resembling their fresh or frozen brethren. But they do have their use, especially as emergency back-ups and for quick meals. Home-canned fruits and vegetables tend to be superior in flavor to commercially canned goods. Tomatoes are one item that change in a positive way when canned; their flavors become richer and more concentrated, making them ideal for sauces.

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

While most fresh fruits and veggies need to be refrigerated, some are ideal for pantry storage. The dark, cool and dry environment of a pantry (or a shelf out of direct sunlight) can help preserve onions, garlic, potatoes, sweet potatoes and winter squash. For best flavor and texture, tomatoes should also be stored at room temperature until ripe.

http://www.ecorazzi.com/2012/07/05/10-must-have-items-for-a-perfect-vegan-pantry/

The Difference Between Active Yeast and Nutritional Yeast

A great explanation from the Happy Herbivore:

Active yeast and nutritional yeast are completely different products that are used for two different things. When people ask me if they can swap out the two and use them interchangeably- I always have to tell them no because the results in whatever they’re making will come out completely different!

Active yeast works as a leavening agent in breads and other baked goods. It’s primarily used to make your baked goods rise and add fluff to a piece of bread or a cinnamon roll. Active yeast can come in a jar, or it can come in little envelopes found in the baking aisle of your grocery store.

Nutritional yeast is a deactivated yeast, so it won’t make things rise and is not a replacement for yeast when baking.
It has a cheesy, nutty flavor that you can use in sauces or as a topping, like sprinkled on popcorn. Nutritional yeast can be bought online or at most health food stores, and comes either as a powder or flakes. It is a complete protein, a good source of vitamins and is dairy & gluten free. Most brands are also fortified with B-12.

Here’s a video on nutritional yeast that might answer more of your questions:

http://happyherbivore.com/2012/06/difference-between-active-yeast-and-nutritional-ye/

My Sumptuous Summer Salad

Today’s lunch.  Actually, it’s usually our lunch everyday, some form of it anyway.

Fresh spinach leaves, fresh kale leaves, cooked lentils with garlic, apple chunks, orange chunks, ground organic flax meal, raw sesame seeds, nutritional yeast, chia seeds, curry, turmeric, cinnamon, shredded cole slaw mix, fresh tomato chunks, unsalted freshly cracked peanuts, freshly cracked pepper.

Whole Food, Clean Eating at its best.

I will top with the Tangy Creamy Balsamic Vinaigrette (Post May 19, 2012)

Some days I top with rinsed Black Beans instead of lentils, some days I’ll top with Basil and Italian Seasonings.  It all depends on what we have available and what I feel like.

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