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Posts tagged ‘tempeh’

Thyme for Tempeh! The Best (and Easiest) Tempeh Recipe I’ve Made– Try It!

GarlickyThymeTempehIsaDoesIt

 

Hi Loyal Plantcentric Follower,

I’m back! Sorry for not posting for so long, but as you know, I’ve been on a scholarly sabbatical. I’ve gone back to school, full-time, to finish up my undergraduate degree, majoring in Communication Studies with a concentration in Health Communication. Fitting, right? Going back to college has been one of the best things that has happened to me. I’m seriously having the time of my life.

During the school year, I’m fortunate to have a wonderful husband who handles dinner for us. Now that I’m off for the summer, I have the time to get back to cooking.

So what made me so excited, that I just had to share with you? Simply the best tempeh recipe ever! It’s from the cookbook “Isa Does It” by Isa Chandra Moskowitz. She writes the blog, Post Punk Kitchen, www.theppk.com. Tempeh is a fermented soy food, and when made with organic or non-GMO soy, it is very healthy for you.

This tempeh turned out so good, that it’s hard to only have one serving. The marinade infused the flavor completely into the tempeh. It will be wonderful in sandwiches. I also believe that omnivores would love it. It is also super quick and easy.

As you know, I am a big believer in using what you have on-hand. The ingredients are below, with my substitutions in parentheses.

8 oz tempeh

For the marinade:
2 tablespoons soy sauce (or tamari) (I used Bragg’s Liquid Aminos)
4 cloves garlic, smashed (I used chopped garlic from a jar.  I never measure garlic.  I usually triple the amount)
1/2 cup veggie broth
2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar (or 1 tablespoon regular balsamic)
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (I used reconstituted)
1/4 cup fresh thyme, leaves whole, soft stems roughly chopped (I used dried)
2 tablespoons olive oil (I omitted)

This made a lot of marinade.  Since there was never any raw meat soaking in it, the marinade can be used again.  You can dip your tempeh in it, au jus style, or use it for salad dressing.

Get the recipe here:  Isa Does It Garlicky Thyme Tempeh

Hope you enjoy it as much as we did!

21 Foolproof Vegan Recipe Substitutions

by Mykalee McGowan

21 Vegan Recipe Substitutions

It was once known as the diet of hippies and extreme animal lovers, but not anymore. Veganism is slowly becoming mainstream as professional bodybuilders and celebs from Mike Tyson to Bill Clinton — not to mention some normal folks — transition to the vegan lifestyle.

The vegan diet means eliminating all animal products on the plate. So most vegans steer clear of meat, dairy, eggs, and even honey. Some vegans are motivated by humanitarian concerns, but the vegan diet has some potential health benefits, too, like a reduced risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, and cancer[1]. Still scared to try the V-word? We’ve rounded up 21 delicious substitutions that can help ease the blow.

Meat

1. Tofu (firm or extra firm): One of the most common substitutes for meat, tofu has a light, fluffy texture. Half a cup packs 10 grams of protein, about half the quantity of protein in the same amount of chicken. (So make sure to add some nuts or sesame seeds when replacing meat with tofu.) Tofu stars in a range of dishes, from vegan lasagna to this summer salsa dish, but there are a fewcooking tips to keep in mind to avoid a tasteless meal.

2. Seitan: Made from wheat gluten, seitan has almost as much protein and less fat than the same amount of ground beef. Even though seitan doesn’t pick up flavors as well as tofu, the texture is more meat-like. It’s a great replacement for meat in beef and chicken main dishes — try this veganteriyaki recipe.

3. Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP): TVP doesn’t exactly sound appealing: It’s basically defatted soy flour (meaning the oils were removed during processing) that comes in the form of granules. But a lot of people find TVP quite tasty — and nutritious. It’s not only a good source of protein, but it’s also rich in fiber, a key nutrient for digestive health. And no need to forgo tacos andchili — TVP’s a great substitute for ground beef or ground turkey!

4. TempehTempeh is made from whole soybeans, meaning it has a pretty bumpy texture. The meat substitute is packed with protein (about 15 grams per half-cup serving), fiber, and all sorts ofantioxidants. The next time a BLT craving hits, skip the bacon and opt instead for a “TLT.” (That’stempeh, lettuce, and tomato.)

5. Chickpeas: Also known as Garbanzo beans, chickpeas are rich in protein (12 grams per cup) and folate, important for red blood cell production and proper brain function. Some great vegan chickpea choices include falafel and “Tu-no,” a vegan tuna recipe that may leave you free of the sea forever.

Cheese

6. Nutritional Yeast: Another meat replacement that’s way more appetizing than it sounds,nutritional yeast is a good source of protein and vitamin B12. Plus it’s a good option for those watching their blood pressure, with about 9 mg of sodium per ounce compared to about 428 mg in the same amount of Parmesan cheese. Still dreaming of Parmesan-covered spaghetti? Sprinkle on some nutritional yeast for some cheesy flavor on pastas and in sauces, like mac and cheese!

7. Soy Cheese: For vegan cheese lovers, this food is almost like magic. Soy cheese melts, spreads and tastes like the real thing — without all the saturated fat! Use soy cheese in all traditional cheese dishes, like fancy fondue. But keep in mind soy cheese doesn’t usually provide as much protein or calcium as most types of milk cheese, so add some nuts or another protein source to a cheese-free meal. Abracadabra!

Milk

8. Soy Milk: One of the most common milk substitutes, soy milk is a nutritional superstar. Some brands pack protein, vitamin D, and 15 percent more calcium than skim milk. With its light taste, soy milk can replace cow’s milk in almost any dish — even doughnuts!

9. Rice Milk: Made from the liquid of ground rice, rice milk is a light-tasting, low-cholesterol alternative to cow’s milk, with about the same amount of calcium. Try it chilly in this ice cream recipe.

10. Almond Milk: Compared to cow’s milk, almond milk is about equal in calories and even higher in healthy fats and antioxidants. This thick milk is great for baking goodies, like this marbled banana bread.

11. Hemp Milk: Yes, hemp milk is made from hemp seeds, marijuana’s cousins. But the high we get from drinking this stuff is from the awesome nutrients. Hemp milk is a great source of omega-3fatty acids, which can help reduce inflammation and improve brain function. (But bones, beware: Hemp milk doesn’t have as much calcium as whole milk, so be sure to get extra calcium from othernon-dairy sources.) Pour it on cereal or in a mocha latte for a delicious milk-free delicacy.

12. Oat Milk: Surprised to hear there’s such a thing as milk made with oats? Don’t be. Oat milk can improve hair and skin health and provide a ton of fiber and iron. It’s lighter in taste than cow’s milk, can replace milk in a variety of recipes, and anyone can make it! Try the cashew version for an extra kick.

13. Coconut Milk: Go cuckoo for coconut milk. This low-calorie liquid packs protein plus vitamins and minerals like magnesium, which aids the muscular system. (The only downside is coconut milk doesn’t have quite as much calcium as cow’s milk.) Coconut milk is great in creamy sauces, especially curry sauces.

Eggs

14. Tofu (silken or soft): Just like an egg, tofu is a great source of protein. (A half-cup serving of tofu has 10 grams of protein; one large egg has 6 grams.) Tofu tastes great in heavy egg dishes likequiche and omelets. Or scramble tofu with some veggies for a nutritious breakfast.

15. Apple Sauce: Using unsweetened apple sauce in vegan baked foods is not only a creative way to replace eggs, but also cuts down on cholesterol. Use ¼-cup applesauce for every egg the recipe calls for, like in raspberry truffle brownies.

16. Flax Seeds: When it comes to baking, flax seeds are a great, if unexpected, substitute for eggs. The seeds turn baked goods from sweet treats into awesome sources of Omega-3 fats and fiber. Remember to ground the flax seeds or buy flaxseed meal before baking. (If not, prepare to eat some chunky muffins.) Then give this gingerbread flax muffin recipe a try.

17. Mashed Bananas: An egg and a banana might look pretty different, but they’re both great binding agents (the stuff that holds all the ingredients together). Use mashed banana as an alternative binding agent in different baking recipes for some potassium-rich cakes or chocolate chip muffins.

Butter

18. Coconut Butter: A nutritious, delicious butter alternative, coconut butter has absolutely no cholesterol. (Regular butter has about 33 milligrams per tablespoon.) Coconut butter’s also packed with nutrients that aid in brain function, immunity, and weight loss. Craving chocolate? Try this mouthwatering fudge recipe.

19. Soy Margarine: This spread might as well be called, “I can’t believe it’s not dairy!” Soy margarine’s as versatile as regular butter and tastes strikingly similar. And unlike regular butter, soy margarine contains no whey, lactose, or casein (all animal products). These crepes require soy margarine or another vegan spread. 

Honey

20. Agave Syrup: Even though it’s made from the same plants responsible for tequila, agave syrup won’t give us that happy-hour buzz. Still, as a honey substitute, it doesn’t disappoint. Agave syrup is sweeter than sugar and thinner than honey — but it can also be filled with fructose and calories, so use it sparingly. Agave syrup’s a great sweetener for teas, juices, desserts, anddressings.

21. Maple Syrup: It’s the secret Aunt Jemimah’s kept for too long: Maple syrup is a great alternative to honey. It’s full of antioxidants, zinc, iron and potassium, nutrients that help boost heart health and the immune system. Plus it’s usually lower in sugar and calories than honey. And flapjacks won’t be the only treat doused in sweet goodness: Maple syrup can also replace honey as an oatmeal topping and even sweeten up blueberry pie.

Did we miss any of your favorite vegan products? Let us know in the comments below!

Works Cited

  1. Position of the American Dietetic Association: vegetarian diets. Craig, W.J, Mangels, A.R., American Dietetic Association. Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2009;109(7):1266-82. []

http://greatist.com/health/vegan-recipe-substitutions/?utm_source=pulsenews&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+greatist+%28Greatist+-+Health+and+Fitness+Articles%2C+News%2C+and+Tips%29

Vegan Myths Debunked

Paul Jarvis

I’ve been vegan for years, so I’ve grown accustomed to certain myths people believe about what it means to eat a plant-based diet and live a creature-free life. Here are a few things people often get wrong about veganism.

All vegans are skinny, white women

We come in all colors, shapes, sizes and genders. Not all vegans are frail/anemic-looking waifs either – some are ultra-marathoners, UFC fighters, famous talk-show hosts, actors and actresses … most, however, are regular men and women. You can’t look like a vegan; you can just live and eat like one.

There’s also an often unspoken view that veganism isn’t very manly since Real Men eat meat. To that I’d say that real men take care of their bodies and want to decrease their risk of things like prostate cancer, diabetes and heart problems (all of which have been shown to worsen due to the consumption of meat and dairy).

Vegan food is all weird soy-based fake meat and cheeses

There are a lot of faux meats and dairy-free cheeses, but they’re not the only option for eating a plant-based diet. Think of them as “gateway drugs” for eating less meat and dairy. They offer comfort in similarity to a “typical” diet and some taste pretty good too. These products are really good for a transition from SAD (Standard American Diet) to a diet more focused on lots of whole vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds and grains. It is really easy to eat vegan without them though, and focus more on eating a variety of whole, plant-based foods.

Veganism isn’t healthy

Technically, you could call yourself a “vegan” and live on potato chips, Oreo cookies (these are vegan because they don’t contain any actual food) and diet soda. But one of the main benefits of an intelligent, plant-based diet is the sheer diversity of whole foods you can and should eat on a daily basis. Every single day I eat more whole foods than I have fingers and toes. Add up all the fruits, veggies, nuts and seeds I’ve consumed by bedtime and it would total far more than 10. Countless studies have shown that eating this way can effectively treat, and even prevent, a slew of chronic diseases. Some real dangers and potential killers related to a non-vegan diet include cancer, diabetes and heart disease – all of which have been linked to dairy and meat consumption by actual medical journals, written by established scientists. So eating a plant-based diet can be really healthy, if you do it correctly.

Vegans can’t get enough protein or calcium

This is definitely the question that vegans hear most often. But when was the last time you heard of anyone being protein deficient in the Western world? It just doesn’t happen – among vegans or omnivores. I get my protein from eating a well-balanced, whole foods diet. There is protein in nuts, seeds, vegetables and many other foods. North Americans are obsessed with protein, and really, we eat far too much of it. If your diet includes various and diverse plant-based foods, you’ll get enough, even if you’re very active. Good sources of protein include foods like almonds, lentils, quinoa, beans, broccoli, tempeh and chickpeas. And none of these proteins have bad fats or cholesterol (bonus!).

Personally, I know that dairy is not a good source of calcium, but I definitely believe the milk industry has an insanely good marketing team. There’s more calcium in small amounts of broccoli, molasses, kale, grains or soy than in a big glass of cow’s milk. There are lots of cultures, past and present, that have never consumed any dairy as part of their diets, and they haven’t shriveled up and died from a lack of calcium.

Veganism is too militant/absolute

Being vegan isn’t a religion or exercise in absolutism. If you are vegan (or heading that way), it doesn’t mean you’ve got to sign up for a militant animal rights group or protest naked outside fur shops. If that’s your thing, all the power to you for making a difference. You can also make a difference in a more subversive way by making omnivore friends a delicious plant-based meal or simply by buying fewer animals and animal products. There are as many types of vegans as there are types of non-vegans – so whatever works for you is the best thing you can do for “The Cause.”

For every study or piece of research published about the benefits of a plant-based diet, there’s a news article that claims the latest healthy eating trend is actually horrible for you. I will offer this key piece of advice: Learn who funded the research you just read, or if it’s an article on a website or in a newspaper, ensure it’s based on a scientific find and not paid for by the meat or dairy industries. There is, unfortunately, a lot of money spent to make people think that meat and dairy are good for you, even if science says otherwise.

Finally, remember that veganism isn’t for everyone. It’s just for folks who want to stay healthy, feel good, live longer and generally be really awesome.

Paul Jarvis is the author of “Eat Awesome: A regular person’s guide to plant-based, whole foods.” He believes veganism is love – and that deliciousness always trumps dogma. He lives with his amazing wife Lisa, in Tofino, British Columbia.

http://crazysexylife.com/2012/vegan-myths-debunked/

10 Must Have Items for a Perfect Vegan Pantry

I agree with everything except the oils.

By Stephanie Rogers, EcoSalon

Stock up on these 10 basic essentials for your vegan pantry including beans, whole grains, non-dairy milk and a variety of seasonings.

Contrary to the assumptions of many a meat eater, vegans don’t solely subsist on lettuce and carrots. But what, exactly, should be stocked in a vegan’s pantry? Anyone looking to make healthy, nutritious meals that are free of animal products should have a few basic ingredients on hand at all times to provide protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals – and let’s not forget flavor. These 10 pantry essentials make sticking to a vegan diet easy and interesting, from beans and whole grains to truffle oils and agave nectar.

Beans, Tofu, Tempeh and Seitan

If there’s one nutrient that Americans tend to focus on when it comes to healthy diets, it’s protein. But no matter what meat-obsessed fad diets imply, it’s easy to get plenty of protein from vegan sources. Beans and tofu are two lean, cholesterol-free options for protein, and they’re incredibly versatile. Canned beans are convenient, but dried beans are cheaper and don’t come with the risk of hormone-altering BPA in the lining of the can. They simply need to be soaked overnight before cooking, or you can whip them up rapidly with a pressure cooker. Firm tofu can be marinated and tossed into just about any dish, while silken tofu is a nutritious addition to smoothies. Seitan is made from wheat gluten and has a meaty texture reminiscent of chicken, and chewy tempeh is a vegan sandwich staple.

Whole Grains & Flours

The difference between whole grains and refined grains goes beyond increased fiber and nutrients. Whole grains are packed with flavor, which translates into tastier dishes and baked goods. Brown rice, quinoa, amaranth, bulgur, spelt, oats, millet, barley and wild rice are a few examples of whole grains that you can incorporate into your diet, and most of them are available in flour form, too. Flours made from quinoa and oats aren’t just for people avoiding gluten – they impart their own particular flavor and texture to recipes like chocolate amaranth quinoa cake.

Non-Dairy Milks

Who needs cow’s milk when there’s almond milk, rice milk, hemp milk, coconut milk and soy milk? Stock your pantry with your favorite varieties of non-dairy milks, each of which has its own particular flavor and texture. Coconut milk and soy milk tend to be richer and heavier, frothing up a little more for satisfying beverages. Rice milk and almond milk have a natural sweetness, and heart-healthy almond milk is appropriately nutty. Soy milk is the highest in protein, and hemp milk has lots of omega fatty acids. Avoid the flavored varieties to cut unnecessary sugar and calories. You can easily make your own almond milk with nothing more than raw almonds, water and a blender.

A Variety of Oils and Vinegars

No kitchen is complete without extra virgin olive oil and white vinegar, no matter what kind of foods you like to eat. Beyond those two absolute basics is a wide variety of vinegars and oils with all kinds of different uses and characteristics. Vinegars include balsamic, red wine, white wine, apple cider, rice and malt. Coconut oil is great for high-heat cooking and baking, sesame oil has lots of flavor for stir-fries and salads, and truffle oils are a luxurious treat. Try oils and vinegars infused with herbs, garlic, chilies and even fruit, too.

Nuts, Seeds & Butters

Head to the bulk bins at your local natural foods store to stock up on a wide variety of nuts and seeds like almonds, cashews, walnuts, macadamia nuts, sesame seeds, flax seeds, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds. You can actually use cashews, macadamias and other types of nuts to make your own vegan ricotta cheese. And when it comes to nut and seed butters, don’t be afraid to branch out from the standard peanut and almond varieties – try cashew, hazelnut and sesame.

Nutritional Yeast

Missing cheese? Aside from making your own nut-based ricotta, you can add a cheesy flavor to all kinds of foods using nutritional yeast. This inactive yeast is a great source of vitamin B12, which can be difficult for vegans to get from other sources. Light and flaky, it can be added to popcorn as a topping, melted into margarine and/or non-dairy milk for a cheesy sauce or just tossed into any dish you like.

Healthy Condiments

Most condiments are processed junk full of fat, sugar and sodium. But there are some healthy condiments that can add complex flavors to your vegan dishes, elevating a simple meal to the sublime. Mustard, soy sauce, miso and hot sauces add a huge punch of flavor with just a few drops. Bragg’s Liquid Aminos, a great vegan source of amino acids, is a popular way to add a little bit of savory “umami” flavor to any dish. Agave nectar is a popular vegan sweetener, and fruit preserves are almost always free of animal products.

Herbs and Spices

Like condiments, oils and vinegars, herbs and spices simply make everything taste better. If you’re new to cooking and/or using spices, buy a variety and experiment to see what you like. Most herbs, including parsley and basil, are best used fresh, but some – like bay leaves and oregano – retain lots of flavor when dried. Spices, which are usually the dried seeds, bark or buds of plants, tend to stay fragrant a bit longer. Some basics include chili powder, paprika, onion powder, garlic powder, ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, turmeric and black pepper. Dried mushrooms are another delicious source of umami flavor.

Canned Fruits and Vegetables

Canned goods generally aren’t the best when it comes to flavor and texture, with many canned veggies – like green beans – barely resembling their fresh or frozen brethren. But they do have their use, especially as emergency back-ups and for quick meals. Home-canned fruits and vegetables tend to be superior in flavor to commercially canned goods. Tomatoes are one item that change in a positive way when canned; their flavors become richer and more concentrated, making them ideal for sauces.

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

While most fresh fruits and veggies need to be refrigerated, some are ideal for pantry storage. The dark, cool and dry environment of a pantry (or a shelf out of direct sunlight) can help preserve onions, garlic, potatoes, sweet potatoes and winter squash. For best flavor and texture, tomatoes should also be stored at room temperature until ripe.

http://www.ecorazzi.com/2012/07/05/10-must-have-items-for-a-perfect-vegan-pantry/

My BLT with Fakin’ Bacon

If you’re like me, summer’s favorite meal was always BLT’s with lots of bacon and Miracle Whip, just a touch of iceburg lettuce and wonderful, juicy tomatoes on Italian bread.  But now that we know better, we do better.  We don’t want all the artery clogging fat from regular bacon (1 slice has 1.1 g. of saturated fat and 2.96 gms. protein.  And have you ever read the ingredients in turkey bacon?  It has mechanically separated turkey.  Sounds too close to what they call pink slime to me.) and mayo or Miracle Whip, and we stay away from anything white (such as white bread, white rice, white flour).

So what is a person to do who is trying to eat healthy but loves BLT’s?  That’s where Lightlife Organic Smoky Tempeh Strips Fakin’ Bacon come in!  If you’ve never had or heard of tempeh,  you really should try it.  Pronounced “tem-pay,”  it is an Indonesian word that means tender-cooked legumes.  The package says they combined Organic Soybeans with Organic Brown Rice and marinated it in a delicious smokey flavor creating a versatile bacon style strip.  Each serving (3 strips) contains 8 g of Soy Protein.  It has 0 g of Saturated Fat.

Organic Smoky Tempeh Strips

So tonight, after all four of us were wiped out from the gym, I used Brownberry Dutch Country Smooth Texture Extra Fiber bread (always pick a bread that says 100% whole wheat and no high fructose corn syrup), 3 slices of Fakin Bacon and instead of iceburg lettuce, we use fresh spinach leaves!  Much more nutritious and so quick and easy.

http://www.lightlife.com/Vegan-Food-Vegetarian-Diet/Organic-Smoky-Tempeh-Strips

http://www.livestrong.com/article/536416-nutrition-of-bacon/

http://www.butterball.com/product/regular-turkey-bacon

http://www.lightlife.com/Vegan-Food-Vegetarian-Diet/Organic-Smoky-Tempeh-Strips

7 Top Sources of Plant-Based Protein

My Top 7 Sources of Plant-Based Protein

I say it all the time. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not only possible to optimize your health on a plant-based diet; when done right, I actually recommend it.
But where do you get your protein?
I field this question constantly. Despite deeply ingrained but misleading conventional wisdom, the truth is that you can survive without meat, eggs and dairy. Believe it or not, you can actually thrive, and never suffer a protein deficiency. Because no matter how active your lifestyle, a well-roundedwhole food plant-based diet provides more than enough protein to satisfy the body’s needs without all the artery-clogging saturated fats that dominate the typical American diet.
I speak from experience. As a vegan endurance athlete, I place a high tax on my body. And yet my plant-based diet has fueled me for years without any negative impact on building lean muscle mass or recovery. In fact, at age 45 I continue to improve and am as fit, healthy, and strong as I have ever been.
Here’s a list of my top-7 plant-based foods high in protein:
 
1. Quinoa: 11g Protein / Cup
A grain like seed, quinoa is a high protein alternative to rice or pasta, served alone or over vegetables and greens. It provides a good base for a veggie burger and is also a fantastic breakfast cereal when served cold with almond or coconut milk and berries.
2. Lentils: 17.9g  Protein / Cup
Delicious, nutritious and super easy to prepare. Trader Joe’s sells them pre-cooked and I’m not afraid to just eat them cold right out of the package for lunch or a snack on the run.
3. Tempeh: 24g Protein / 4 Ounces
A fermented soybean-based food, tempeh is a healthy protein-packed alternative to it’s non-fermented cousin tofu. It makes for a great veggie burger and doubles as a tasty meat alternative to meatballs in pasta, or over brown rice and vegetables.
4. Seitan: 24g Protein / 4 Ounces
An excellent substitute for beef, fish and soy products, one serving provides about 25% of your RDA of protein. But not for those with gluten sensitivities, as it is made from wheat gluten.
5. Beans (Black, Kidney, Mung, Pinto): 12-15g Protein / Cup
I love beans. Great on a veggie burrito, in chili and soups, on salads or over rice with vegetables, beans of all varieties are a daily staple of my diet.
6. Spirulina: 6g Protein / 10 grams
A blue-green algae, spirulina is a highly bioavailable complete protein containing all essential amino acids. At 60% protein (the highest of any natural food), it’s a plant-based protein powerhouse that finds it way into my Vitamix blends daily.
7. Hemp Seeds: 16g Protein / 3 Tbsp
With a perfect ration of omega-6 and omega-3 EFA’s, hemp seeds are another bioavailable complete protein rivaled only by spirulina. A simple and great addition to a multitude of dishes, from breakfast cereal to salads to smoothies to vegetables and rice.
Bonus: Here’s a little inspirational video!

Published April 11, 2012 at 4:45 PM
About Rich Roll

Rich is a two-time top finisher at the Ultraman World Championships and in 2010 was the first person (along with colleague Jason Lester) to complete EPIC5 – 5 ironman-distance triathlons on 5 Hawaiian Islands in under a week.
His inspirational memoir FINDING ULTRA: Rejecting Middle Age, Becoming One of the World’s Fittest Men, and Discovering Myself (Crown / Random House) hits bookshelves May 22, 2012 and is currently available for pre-order.
For more on how Rich fuels his family and training, check out his and his wife Julie’s plant-based e-cookbook JAI SEED – a beautiful coffee-table style cookbook for the digital iPad set that contains 77 glossy pages of plant-based nutrition information and easy to prepare recipes certain to satisfy even the most finicky family member.
Follow Rich on FacebookTwitter or at RichRoll.com

How to Meet Your Protein Needs without Meat

How to Meet Your Protein Needs without Meat

A Guide to Vegetarian Protein Sources

— By Sarah Haan, Registered Dietitian and Nicole Nichols, Health Educator
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Eating a vegetarian diet can be very healthful and rewarding. However, most vegetarians—including soon-to-be vegetarians and their meat-eating loved ones—are concerned about getting adequate protein. Most people are accustomed to getting protein from meat, but what else contains protein? Aren’t plant-based proteins “incomplete” or lower quality?Fortunately, with a bit of extra attention, you won’t have any trouble meeting your protein needs just because you give up meat. There are so many protein-packed vegetarian options! Did you know that most foods, including vegetables, have some of the essential muscle-building nutrient? Without looking closely, it is easy to miss some great sources. (Who knew a cup of broccoli had 3 grams!)Nuts, seeds, soy products, cereal, eggs and dairy are all good meatless protein choices. These groups of food each contain different amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and different levels of protein quality. There is no need to consume certain foods in special combinations as nutritionists once thought! When your diet includes a variety of each of these types of foods, you can rest assured that you’re consuming all the amino acids you need for muscle growth and cell repair.

Nuts
Nuts provide a good dose of protein along with some heart-healthy fatty acids and antioxidants (vitamins A and E). They are also packed full of fiber. Take your pick! Many nuts have a significant source of protein ready to work for your body. Peanuts, almonds, pistachios, cashews, and pine nuts are among the highest in protein, while chestnuts and hazelnuts, although they do still have some protein, are the lowest. Think out of the box when you’re adding nuts to your diet. They can be grated, toasted, ground or eaten raw and are great when combined with salads, wraps, soups and stews and baked goods. But pay special attention to portion size! Nuts are a great source of many nutrients, but do come with a hefty dose of calories, thanks to the healthy fats they contain. A single serving is just 1 oz! Many nuts are best when stored in a refrigerator, which helps keep their fats from going rancid (for up to 6 months).

Nuts, 1/4 cup Protein Calories Fat
Peanuts, raw 9 g 207 18 g
Almonds, dry roasted 8 g 206 18 g
Pistachios 6 g 171 14 g
Hazelnuts 5 g 212 21 g
Pine nuts 5 g 229 23 g
Cashews, raw 5 g 197 16 g
Walnuts 4 g 164 16 g

Seeds
Seeds are another great way to grab a few grams of protein and many other nutrients. Healthful unsaturated fats, as well as phytochemicals, make seeds a powerhouse for heart disease and cancer prevention. Just a quarter cup of pumpkin seeds (also called pepitas) has 8.5 grams of protein. Add this amount to a salad or eat them plain for a quick snack. Sunflower seeds are easy to add to pasta or salads, or sandwich wraps, while sesame seeds are easily ground and sprinkled onto steamed veggies for a protein dusting.

Seeds (1/4 cup) Protein Calories Fat
Hemp seeds 15 g 232 18 g
Pumpkin seeds, roasted 9 g 187 16 g
Flaxseed 8 g 191 13 g
Sunflower seeds, roasted 8 g 205 18 g
Sesame seeds, roasted 6 g 206 18 g

Legumes
Dried peas, beans and lentils belong to a group of food known as “pulses” or “legumes.” Aside from soybeans, these plants have a very similar nutrient content, which includes a good dose of protein. On average, they have about 15 grams of protein per cup, and tagging along with the essentials protein are fiber and iron. Adding beans, lentils and dried peas to your meals is a great way to replace meat (a beef burrito can easily become a black bean burrito, for example) while still getting your much needed protein. Add pulses to soups, salads, omelets, burritos, casseroles, pasta dishes, and more! Make bean dips (such as hummus, which is made from garbanzo beans, or black bean dip) to spread on sandwiches and use as protein-packed dips for veggies or snack foods.

Legumes, 1 cup cooked Protein Calories Fiber
Soybeans 29 g 298 10 g
Lentils 18 g 230 16 g
Split peas 16 g 231 16 g
Navy beans 16 g 258 12 g
Garbanzo beans (chickpeas) 15 g 269 12 g
Black beans 15 g 227 15 g
Kidney beans 15 g 225 11 g
Lima beans 15 g 216 13 g
Pinto beans 14 g 234 15 g

Soy
Soybeans are a complete protein that is comparable in quality with animal proteins. Eating soybeans (and foods made from soybeans) has been growing trend in America for only five decades, but this protein-rich bean has been a staple in Asia for nearly 4,000 years! This plant powerhouse is used to create a variety of soy-based foods that are rich in protein: tofu, tempeh, textured vegetable protein (TVP, a convincing replacement for ground meat in recipes), soymilk and “meat analogs,” such as vegetarian “chicken” or faux “ribs” are all becoming more popular as more Americans practice vegetarianism. To learn more about using tofu, read Tofu 101. To learn how soy may impact your health, click here.

Soy Foods Protein Calories Fat
Soybeans, 1 cup cooked 29 g 298 10 g
Tempeh, 4 oz cooked 21 g 223 13 g
Edamame, 1 cup shelled 20 g 240 10 g
TVP, 1/4 cup dry 12 g 80 0 g
Soy nuts, 1/4 cup roasted 11 g 200 1 g
Tofu, 4 oz raw 9 g 86 5 g
Soy nut butter, 2 tablespoons 7 g 170 11 g
Soymilk, 1 cup sweetened 7 g 100 0.5 g
Soymilk, 1 cup unsweetened 7 g 80 0.5 g

Grains
In a culture that focuses largely on wheat, it’s easy to overlook the many types of other grains available to us. Some of these grains are very high in protein and can be included in your diet for both whole-grain carbohydrates and muscle-building protein. Quinoa is unusually close to animal products in protein quality, making it an excellent grain to replace white rice or couscous. It can also be cooked and mixed with honey, berries and almonds in the morning for a protein-packed breakfast. Other grains high in protein include spelt, amaranth, oats and buckwheat. Choose whole-grain varieties of cereals, pastas, breads and rice for a more nutritious meal.

Grains Protein Calories Fiber
Amaranth, 1 cup cooked 9 g 238 9 g
Quinoa, 1 cup cooked 9 g 254 4 g
Whole wheat pasta, 1 cup cooked 8 g 174 6 g
Barley, 1 cup cooked 7 g 270 14 g
Spelt, 4 oz cooked 6 g 144 4 g
Oats, 1 cup cooked 6 g 147 4 g
Bulgur, 1 cup cooked 6 g 151 8 g
Buckwheat, 1 cup cooked 6 g 155 5 g
Brown rice, 1 cup cooked 5 g 216 4 g
Whole wheat bread, 1 slice 4 g 128 3 g
Sprouted grain bread, 1 slice 4 g 80 3 g

Dairy
If you consume milk products, dairy is a great way to add some extra grams of protein to your day. Low-fat milk, cheese and yogurt are easily accessible, quick to pack and fun to incorporate into many meals and snacks. Whether you’re drinking a cup of skim milk with your dinner or grabbing some string cheese before you run errands, you can pack about 8 grams of protein into most servings of dairy. You’re also getting some bone-building calcium while you’re at it! Keep in mind that low-fat varieties of milk products are lower in calories and fat, but equal in calcium to the full-fat versions; low-fat varieties may also be higher in protein.

Dairy Protein Calories Fat
Fat-free cottage cheese, 1 cup 31 g 160 1 g
2% cottage cheese, 1 cup 30 g 203 4 g
1% cottage cheese, 1 cup 28 g 163 2 g
Fat-free plain yogurt, 1 cup 14 g 137 0 g
Low-fat plain yogurt, 1 cup 13 g 155 4 g
Parmesan cheese, 1 oz grated 12 g 129 9 g
Whole milk yogurt, 1 cup 9 g 150 8 g
Goat’s milk, 1 cup 9 g 168 10 g
1% milk, 1 cup 8 g 102 2 g
Swiss cheese, 1 oz 8 g 106 8 g
2% milk, 1 cup 8 g 121 7 g
3.25% (whole) milk, 1 cup 8 g 146 8 g
Low-fat cheddar/Colby cheese, 1 oz 7 g 49 2 g
Part-skim mozzarella cheese, 1 oz 7 g 72 5 g
Provolone cheese, 1 oz 7 g 100 8 g
Cheddar cheese, 1 oz 7 g 114 9 g
Blue cheese, 1 oz 6 g 100 8 g
American cheese, 1 oz 6 g 106 9 g
Goat cheese, 1 oz 5 g 76 6 g
Feta cheese, 1 oz 4 g 75 6 g
Part-skim ricotta cheese, 1 oz 3 g 39 2 g

Eggs
Eggs contain the highest biologic value protein available. What this means is that an egg has a near perfect combination of amino acids within its shell; when assessing protein quality of all other foods (including meat), nutrition experts compare them to the egg. This doesn’t mean that all other sources of protein are less healthful or less important but does mean that an egg is an awesome way to get a few grams of protein. At 6 grams for one large egg, there are endless ways to add it to your diet. Salads, sandwiches, breakfasts or snack—an egg can fit in anytime!

Eggs Protein Calories Fat
Egg, 1 boiled 6 g 68 5 g
Egg white, 1 cooked 5 g 17 0 g
Liquid egg substitute, 1.5 fl oz 5 g 23 0 g

As you can see, protein is EVERYWHERE in our diet, and even without meat you can get enough every day; you just have to look in the right places! For more ideas for using these various plant-based proteins, check out our dailySpark series, Meat-Free Fridays for recipe and cooking ideas!

Selected Sources
Information Sheet: Protein from The Vegetarian Society (VegSoc.org)

Various nutrient profiles from The World’s Healthiest Foods (WHFoods.com)


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About The Author

Sarah HaanSarah Haan
Sarah is a registered dietitian with a bachelor’s degree in dietetics. She helps individuals adopt healthy lifestyles and manage their weight. An avid exerciser and cook, Sarah likes to run, lift weights and eat good food. See all of Sarah’s articles.

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