My Plantcentric Journey

Posts tagged ‘lung cancer’

Eat Rice? 4 Ways to Avoid Arsenic

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Arsenic, a known cancer causing agent, is showing up in our rice.  A new report shows that it is turning up in brown rice, white rice, rice milk and even in baby foods.

A known carcinogen that increases the risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer, a growing number of us are asking: what’s an eater to do?  Especially in light of the fact that the American Cancer Society now reports that 41% of Americans are expected to get cancer in their lifetimes.

Thankfully, there is a lot.  And this infographic from the Consumers Reports offers insight and suggestions.

Their top four suggestions:

  • Introduce other grains into your diet
  • Limit your family’s intake of rice and rice products (or opt out of rice altogether if you can)
  • Rinse your rice thoroughly before cooking
  • Use extra water when cooking rice and then drain it
When it comes to protecting the health of our families and country, knowledge is power.  And so is love.  So share this with those you love, knowing that together, we can create the changes we want to see in the health of our food system.
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Want to Slow Down or Stop Cancer Growth? (Even if You’ve Not Been Diagnosed Yet.) Who Wouldn’t?

Wow.  This is powerful.  This is why I eat vegan and this is why I share this blog.  We need to get this info out to everyone.  Laura

Ex Vivo Cancer Proliferation Bioassay

Two weeks on a plant-based diet appears to significantly enhance cancer defenses against breast cancer and colon cancer cells. The blood of those eating a vegan diet for a year suppresses cancer cell growth nearly eight times better.

http://nutritionfacts.org/video/developing-an-ex-vivo-cancer-proliferation-bioassay/?utm_source=NutritionFacts.org&utm_campaign=119aec1ed2-RSS_VIDEO_DAILY&utm_medium=email

The Benefits of Middle-Age Fitness

Peter Cade/Getty Images

Must read! Being physically fit “compresses the time” that someone is likely to spend being debilitated during old age, leaving the earlier post-retirement years free of serious illness and, at least potentially, imbued with a finer quality of life. It’s not about living longer–it’s about living “healthier” as you age.

Although we are living longer, the incidence of a variety of chronic diseases, like diabetes, cancer and heart disease, has also been growing dramatically, particularly among people who are not yet elderly.

The convergence of those two developments has led to what some researchers have identified as a “lengthening of morbidity.” That means we are spending more years living with chronic disease and ill health — not the outcome that most of us would hope for from a prolonged life span.

Can you imagine the benefits of combining diet changes right along with becoming physically fit from middle-age on?

Best article you can read this week–based on a long-term follow-up of the medical & Medicare records of over 18,000 people who had visited the Cooper Clinic during middle-age–and published last week in the Archives of Internal Medicine, “Midlife Fitness and the Development of Chronic Conditions in Later Life” http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1352789

By GRETCHEN REYNOLD

Americans are living longer, with our average life expectancy now surpassing 78 years, up from less than 74 years in 1980. But we are not necessarily living better. The incidence of a variety of chronic diseases, like diabetes and heart disease, has also been growing dramatically, particularly among people who are not yet elderly.

The convergence of those two developments has led to what some researchers have identified as a “lengthening of morbidity.” That means we are spending more years living with chronic disease and ill health — not the outcome that most of us would hope for from a prolonged life span.

But a notable new study published last week in Archives of Internal Medicine suggests that a little advance planning could change that prospect. Being or becoming fit in middle age, the study found, even if you haven’t previously bothered with exercise, appears to reshape the landscape of aging.

For the study, researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and the Cooper Institute in Dallas gathered medical records for 18,670 middle-aged men and women who’d visited the Cooper Clinic (the medical arm of the Cooper Institute) for a checkup beginning in 1970.

The 18,670 men and women, with an average age of 49, were healthy and free of chronic diseases at their first checkup, when they all took a treadmill test to determine their aerobic fitness. Based on the results of this initial fitness test, the researchers divided the group into five fitness categories, with the bulk of the people residing, like most Americans, in the least-fit section.

Then, in a first-of-its-kind data comparison, the researchers checked the same individuals’ Medicare claim records (with permission) from 1999 through 2009, by which time most of the participants were in their 70s or 80s.

What they found was that those adults who had been the least fit at the time of their middle-age checkup also were the most likely to have developed any of eight serious or chronic conditions early in the aging process. These include heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and colon or lung cancer.

The adults who’d been the most fit in their 40s and 50s often developed many of the same conditions, but notably their maladies appeared significantly later in life than for the less fit. Typically, the most aerobically fit people lived with chronic illnesses in the final five years of their lives, instead of the final 10, 15 or even 20 years.

While this finding might not seem, on its face, altogether positive — the fit and the unfit alike generally became infirm at some point, the Medicare records showed — the results should be viewed as encouraging, says Dr. Benjamin Willis, a staff epidemiologist at the Cooper Institute who led the study. “I’m 58, and for me, the results were a big relief,” Dr. Willis said.

That’s because, he points out, the results show, in essence, that being physically fit “compresses the time” that someone is likely to spend being debilitated during old age, leaving the earlier post-retirement years free of serious illness and, at least potentially, imbued with a finer quality of life.

Interestingly, the effects of fitness in this study statistically were greater in terms of delaying illness than in prolonging life. While those in the fittest group did tend to live longer than the least fit, perhaps more important was the fact that they were even more likely to live well during more of their older years.

Of course, aging is a complicated process and extremely individualized, with the onset or absence of illness representing only one element in quality of life after age 65 or so. But it is a big element, says Dr. Jarett Berry, an assistant professor of internal medicine at U.T. Southwestern and an author of the study. “And since it appears to be associated with midlife fitness, it is amenable to change,” he continues.

While aerobic fitness is partly determined by genetics, and to that extent, the luck of the universe, much of a person’s fitness, especially by middle age, depends on physical activity, Dr. Berry says.

So, exercising during midlife, especially if you haven’t been, can pay enormous later-life benefits, he says. “Our study suggests that someone in midlife who moves from the least fit to the second-to-the-least-fit category of fitness gets more benefit,” in terms of staving off chronic diseases, than someone who moves to the highest fitness grouping from the second-highest.

And moving out of that least-fit category requires, he says, “only a small dose of exercise,” like 20 or 30 minutes of walking on most days of the week.

“You don’t have to become an athlete,” says Dr. Willis, who himself has little time for exercise but tries to fit in a daily walk. “Just getting up off the couch is key.”


This post has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: September 5, 2012

An earlier version of this article erroneously included cancer in a list of chronic diseases whose incidence is rising in the United States.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/05/the-benefits-of-middle-age-fitness/?smid=fb-share

Should You Be Taking an Aspirin a Day?

We take 2 baby aspirins every night.  Laura

 

The latest research findings state that an aspirin a day can help keep skin cancer away.   “Longer, higher-intensity use, for example, led to a 46% lower risk of melanoma, a 35% lower risk of squamous cell carcinoma and a 17% lower risk of basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer in the U.S. ”

Also, “Previous studies have found that aspirin users enjoyed a lower risk of colon cancer; a trial published earlier this year concluded that people who take a daily aspirin have as much as a 46% lower risk of colon, lung and prostate cancers, compared with non-users.”

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2012/05/29/can-aspirin-help-ward-off-skin-cancer/#ixzz1wNfvJZZu

Here’s what Dr. Oz has to say:  http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/aspirin-miracle-pill

“Most cancer patients in this country die of chemotherapy.” Allen Levin, MD

“Most cancer patients in this country die of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy does not eliminate breast, colon, or lung cancers. This fact has been documented for over a decade, yet doctors still use chemotherapy for these tumors.” – Allen Levin, MD UCSF The Healing of Cancer

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