My Plantcentric Journey

Posts tagged ‘heart health’

6 Types of Seeds to Add to Your Diet

Nuts get lots of attention when we talk about foods that pack a big nutritional punch. However, seeds bring equally big nutritional benefits to the table. Take a look at the list below and you’ll see what I mean. Try adding a handful of these seeds to your oatmeal or yogurt, or just eat ’em on their own to tap into the benefits!

  • hemp-seeds-foar296.jpgSunflower seeds: Sunflower seeds are the food with the highest natural content of vitamin E. Not only is vitamin E an important antioxidant for your skin and keeping you looking young, it is also important for a healthy heart. Sprinkle a couple of tablespoons of sunflower seeds over your slaw or salad for instant crunch and flavor.
  • Flax seeds: Flax seeds contain important omega-3 fatty acids, which promote heart and brain health. However, the seeds need to be ground in order for you to get these benefits. Buy them pre-ground or run them through a coffee grinder and add two tablespoons of the ground seeds to your morning smoothie or yogurt.
  • Hemp seeds: Hemp seeds are a great source of protein and they contain omega-3 fatty acids. You can enjoy hemp seeds whole. Try them sprinkled over fresh fruit to add some crunchy texture.
  • Chia seeds: These small seeds (pictured above) provide fiber and omega-3, 6 and 9 fatty acids. In addition to that, they provide iron and calcium. The best way to add them to your diet is by stirring 1-2 tablespoons into water or your favorite beverage for 3-5 minutes, then enjoying.
  • Pumpkin seeds: Enjoy roasted pumpkin seeds on their own to get in a good source of iron and zinc, nutrients important for maintaining energy levels and supporting the immune system.
  • Sesame seeds: You may have only thought of these seeds as a garnish for a hamburger bun in the past, but sesame seeds are actually a good source of calcium, copper and manganese. The last two are important for regulating your body’s functions and helping with nutrient absorption. Toast a couple of tablespoons in a dry skillet over medium heat until fragrant and add to your favorite stir-fry to get these benefits.

posted by Sarah-Jane Bedwell

http://www.self.com/fooddiet/blogs/eatlikeme/2012/08/six-nutrient-rich-seeds.html?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews&mobify=0

Rosie O’Donnell Now Following Plant-Based Diet After Heart Attack

Welcome Rosie!

(As I always say, why wait until a heart attack? Better late than never!)   Laura

8/25/12 she tweeted:  Rosie O’Donnell ‏@Rosie

Oh my god I lost 10 lbs already eating plant based food !!!pic.twitter.com/LwTJNa43

The comedienne revealed on via Twitter that she is committed to a plant-based diet following her recent health scare.

After her recent heart attack, comedienne and former talk show-host Rosie O’Donnell took to her Twitter last Thursday to share her new commitment to a plant-based diet, tweeting “nine days later—nine pounds lost—eating a plant-based diet #likeBillClinton.” The outspoken comic is re-evaluating her eating habits after the health scare last week, sharing on her blog that instead of heading to the hospital, she simply searched “women’s heart attack symptoms” on the internet and followed instructions provided by an online commercial. After eventually visiting a cardiologist, O’Donnell learned her left anterior descending artery was 99-percent blocked. O’Donnell had previously admitted to Dr. Oz that she did not exercise, was a closet eater, and frequently indulged in wine and diet ice cream.

Photo via premierguidemedia.com

http://vegnews.com/articles/page.do?pageId=4872&catId=8

Preventing Heart Disease – At Any Age American Heart Association

You’re never too young— or too old — to take care of your heart.

Multi-Generational Family Outdoor Portrait

 

Preventing heart disease (and allcardiovascular diseases) means making smart choices now that will pay off the rest of your life.

Lack of exercise, a poor diet and other bad habits can take their toll over the years. Anyone at any age can benefit from simple steps to keep their heart healthy during each decade of life. Here’s how:

All Age Groups
No matter what your age, everyone can benefit from a healthy diet and adequate physical activity.

  • Choose a healthy eating plan.  The food you eat can decrease your risk of heart disease and stroke.  Choose foods low in saturated fat, trans fatcholesterolsodium and added sugars and sweeteners.  As part of a healthy diet, eat plenty of fruits and vegetablesfiber-rich whole grainsfish (preferably oily fish — at least twice per week), nuts, legumes and seeds.  Also try eating some meals without meat.  Select fat-free and low-fat dairy products and lean meats and poultry (skinless).  Limit sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Be physically active.  You can slowly work up to at least 2½ hours (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity (like brisk walking) every week or an hour and 15 minutes (75 minutes) of vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity (such as jogging or running) or a combination of both every week. Additionally, on two or more days a week you need muscle-strengthening activities that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest shoulders and arms).

In Your 20s
Getting smart about your heart early on puts you far ahead of the curve. The things you do — and don’t — are a tell-tale sign of how long and how well you’re going to live, said Richard Stein, M.D. “There’s no one I know who said: ‘I felt better being sedentary. I felt better eating a terrible diet,’” said Stein, a cardiologist and professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine. “All these things actually make you feel better while they help you.”

  • Find a doctor and have regular wellness exams. Healthy people need doctors, too. Establishing a relationship with a physician means you can start heart-health screenings now. Talk to your doctor about your diet, lifestyle and checking your blood pressurecholesterolheart ratebody mass index and waist circumference. You may also need your blood sugar checked if you are pregnant, overweight or havediabetes. Knowing where your numbers stand early makes it easier to spot a possible change in the future.
  • Be physically active. It’s a lot easier to be active and stay active if you start at a young age. “If you’re accustomed to physical activity, you’ll sustain it,” Dr. Stein said. Keep your workout routine interesting by mixing it up and finding new motivators.
  • Don’t smoke and avoid secondhand smoke. If you picked up smoking as a teen, it’s time to quit smoking. Even exposure to secondhand smoke poses a serious health hazard. Nonsmokers are up to 30 percent more likely to develop heart disease or lung cancer from secondhand smoke exposure at home or work, according to a U.S. Surgeon General report.

In Your 30s
Juggling family and career leaves many adults with little time to worry about their hearts. Here are some ways to balance all three.

  • Make heart-healthy living a family affair. Create and sustain heart-healthy habits in your kids and you’ll reap the benefits, too. Spend less time on the couch and more time on the move. Explore a nearby park on foot or bike. Shoot some hoops or walk the dog. Plant a vegetable and fruit garden together in the yard, and invite your kids into the kitchen to help cook.
  • Know your family history. Shake your family tree to learn about heart health. Having a relative with heart disease increases your risk, especially if the relative is a parent or sibling. That means you need to focus on risk factors you can control by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, not smoking and eating right. Also, keep your doctor informed about any heart problems you learn about in your family.
  • Tame your stress. Long-term stress causes an increase in heart rate and blood pressure that may damage the artery walls. Learning stress management techniques benefits your body and your quality of life. Try deep breathing exercises and find time each day to do something you enjoy. Giving back through volunteering also does wonders for knocking out stress.

In Your 40s
If heart health hasn’t been a priority, don’t worry. Healthy choices you make now can strengthen your heart for the long haul. Understand why you need to make lifestyle changes and have the confidence to make them. Then, tackle them one at a time. “Each success makes you more confident to take on the next one,” said Dr. Stein, who is also an American Heart Association volunteer.

  • Watch your weight. In your 40s, your metabolism starts slowing down. But you can avoid weight gain by following a heart-healthy diet and getting plenty of exercise. The trick is to find a workout routine you enjoy. If you need motivation to get moving, find a workout buddy or join American Heart Association Walking Paths and Walking Clubs.
  • Have your blood sugar level checked. In addition to blood pressure checks and other heart-health screenings, you should have a fasting blood glucose test by the time you’re 45. This first test serves as a baseline for future tests, which you should have every three years. Testing may be done earlier or more often if you are overweight, diabetic or at risk for becoming diabetic.
  • Don’t brush off snoring. Listen to your sleeping partner’s complaints about your snoring. One in five adults has at least mild sleep apnea, a condition that causes pauses in breathing during sleep. If not properly treated, sleep apnea can contribute to high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.

In Your 50s
Unlike the emergence of wrinkles and gray hair, what you can’t see as you get older is the impact aging has on your heart. So starting in the 50s, you need to take extra steps.

In Your 60s+
With age comes an increased risk for heart disease. Your blood pressure, cholesterol and other heart-related numbers tend to rise. Watching your numbers closely and managing any health problems that arise — along with the requisite healthy eating and exercise — can help you live longer and better.

  • Have an ankle-brachial index test. Starting in your 60s, an ankle-brachial index test should be done every one to two years as part of a physical exam. The test assesses the pulses in the feet to help diagnoseperipheral artery disease (PAD), a lesser-known cardiovascular disease in which plaque builds up in the leg arteries.
  • Watch your weight. Your body burns fewer calories as you get older. Excess weight causes your heart to work harder and increases the risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol. Exercising regularly and eating smaller portions of nutrient-rich foods may help you maintain a healthy weight.
  • Learn the warning signs of a heart attack and stroke. Heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men. Knowing when you’re having a heart attack or stroke means you’re more likely to get immediate help. Quick treatment can save your life and prevent serious disability.

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/MyHeartandStrokeNews/Preventing-Heart-Disease—At-Any-Age_UCM_442925_Article.jsp

Edamame Hummus Joy Bauer’s Food Cures

Joy Bauer's Food Cures

This is what I made today:  (Turned out to be my family’s favorite homemade hummus recipe yet!) I portion it all out into little custard cups and keep in the fridge.   Be sure to use non-GMO organic edamame.  Laura

Here’s a twist on classic hummus that uses edamame (young, green soybeans) in place of chickpeas. Edamame are packed with protein and fiber, a nutrient duo that gives this dip real staying power.

About This Recipe
Cook Time: 5 mins
Total Time: 5 mins
Serving(s)

Amount Per Serving
Calories: 40
Total Fat: 3 g
Saturated Fat: 0 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 40 mg
Total Carbohydrate: 2 g
Dietary Fiber: 1 g
Protein: 2 g
Sugars: 0 g
INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cup(s) edamame, shelled, frozen, thawed
  • 1/3 cup(s) water
  • 3 tablespoon vinegar, rice
  • 2 tablespoon tahini (sesame seed paste)
  • 2 tablespoon oil, olive, extra virgin
  • 1 clove(s) garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, Kosher, plus more to taste
  • pepper, black, to taste

PREPARATION

In a food processor combine the edamame, water, rice vinegar, tahini, olive oil, garlic, and ½ teaspoon kosher salt, and process until smooth. Season with black pepper and additional salt to taste.Serving Size: 2 tablespoons

I drained the oil off of the tahini when I opened it, just like I do with our peanut butter.  I also didn’t use oil or salt.

14 Ingredients to Avoid for Your Heart Health Dr. Weil

14 Ingredients to Avoid for Your Heart Health

An important first step in creating a heart-healthy kitchen is to read and understand food labels. They are your best reference for assessing what to add to your grocery cart and what to leave on the store shelf. Use the list below to determine what items to avoid buying – many of these ingredients are considered pro-inflammatory and therefore unfavorable to a heart-healthy diet.

If the product contains one or more of these undesirables, don’t buy it!

  1. Artificial sweeteners or non-nutritive sweeteners
  2. Corn oil
  3. Cottonseed oil
  4. Fractionated oil
  5. High fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
  6. Hydrogenated oil or vegetable shortening
  7. Margarine
  8. Palm or palm kernel oil
  9. Partially hydrogenated oil (source of trans-fat)
  10. Blended vegetable oils
  11. Safflower oil
  12. Soybean oil
  13. Sunflower oil
  14. Fat “substitutes” (such as olestra)

From:  Dr. Weil’s Heart Health Newsletter

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