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Posts tagged ‘pancreatic cancer’

How Does Gerson Therapy Stack Up Against Chemotherapy?

 

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Preventing Pancreatic Cancer

Preventing pancreatic cancer infographic

New Report: Thousands of Pancreatic Cancers in the U.S. Can Be Prevented

www.aicr.org » Cancer Research Update

AICR logo

“There is still clear and convincing evidence that diets high in a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans lower risk for several cancers, including those of the colorectum, esophagus, stomach and more,” said AICR’s Alice Bender, MS, RD.

Pancreas In Situ Xray Image

 

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Usually diagnosed in advanced stages, it claims the lives of nine out of ten patients within five years’ time. Now a report released today from the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) finds clear and convincing evidence that many cases of pancreatic cancer can be prevented.

“The latest report from the AICR/WCRF Continuous Update Project, one of the largest cancer prevention research projects in the world, shows that being overweight and obese increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer,” said Continuous Update Project (CUP) Panel Member Elisa Bandera, MD, PhD, of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

AICR/WCRF estimates that being lean can prevent 19 percent of pancreatic cancer cases that occur in the United States every year – or roughly one out of every five. That’s equivalent to 23 cases a day, and approximately 8,300 cases every year, that never have to happen, in the U.S. alone. (See the Cancer Preventability Chart)

In comparison, tobacco use, the number one risk factor for pancreatic cancer, is responsible for 1 out of every 4 cases of the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

For the latest report on pancreatic cancer, the CUP evaluated an additional 79 recent papers relating to pancreatic cancer, diet and lifestyle. This was added to the 129 research papers already included for the AICR/WCRF 2007 second expert report.

“With the recent news that pancreatic cancer rates are on the rise, this report should be seen as a wake-up call,” Bandera said. “It’s still another example of the severe toll the obesity epidemic is taking on our health.”

Fat and Pancreatic Cancer: What’s the Link?

In addition to pancreatic cancer, carrying excess body fat has been shown to increase risk for cancers of the breast (postmenopausal), colon, esophagus, kidney, endometrium and gall bladder, along with other chronic diseases such as 2 diabetes and heart disease.

The pancreas is a gland located behind the stomach that produces digestive juices as well as insulin and other hormones. Research continues to document several reasons why carrying excess fat increases risk for pancreatic cancer.

Fat tissue produces cytokines (proteins) that cause inflammation, which link to changes that promote cancer in healthy cells. Being overweight and obese also increases blood levels of insulin and related hormones that can encourage the growth of cancer.

The Latest: Folate Link Downgraded

Research on cancer prevention is always evolving, which is why AICR/WCRF created the CUP, a living database of the global cancer research that is investigating links between lifestyle and cancer risk. As research is added to the database, the CUP panel periodically re-evaluates the strength of various links to ensure that AICR’s advice always reflects the state-of-the-science.
The AICR/WCRF CUP Pancreatic Cancer 2012 report also finds that it is no longer clear that foods containing folate protect against pancreatic cancer. This represents a downgrading of the judgment from the AICR/WCRF second expert report, which concluded in 2007 that there was evidence for a probable link between foods containing folate and lower risk for pancreatic cancer.

Foods containing folate include dark leafy greens, beans and peanuts.

But experts at AICR point out that this downgrade does not change the organization’s take-home message that plant-based diets are cancer-protective. “There is still clear and convincing evidence that diets high in a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans lower risk for several cancers, including those of the colorectum, esophagus, stomach and more,” said AICR’s Alice Bender, MS, RD.

The new report also confirms the findings that coffee does not link to pancreatic cancer risk.

The Bottom Line

Maintaining a healthy weight is one of the most important things you can do to prevent this deadly disease. Avoiding tobacco use is another. If you smoke, stop now. If you don’t, never start.

Pancreas Matrix 2012

http://www.aicr.org/cancer-research-update/2012_10_04/cru-report-thousands.html

Cabbage Family Veggies Reduce Cancer Risk

Having had several friends pass away recently and several more friends and acquaintances battling cancer right now, I want to do all I can to share the latest research, thus www.itsadecision.com was born.  I’m not ashamed to say that having had my childhood friend, Donna, pass away this past winter of brain cancer, just a month before her 50th birthday has scared me to death.  I have completely changed my eating.  I feel like a new, lighter, younger person.  Hopefully, I’ll live to a nice, ripe old age.  Follow my blog and I’ll keep posting the latest research on how to live a healthy lifestyle.

Seems like such an easy thing to do to prevent cancer:

Cancer Prevention: Cruciferous Veggies

broccoliBroccoli is loaded with cancer-fighting plant chemicals.

In honor of World Cancer Day, we’re focusing on cruciferous veggies—those from the cabbage family. Studies show that these vegetables have a special plant chemical that protects against cancer. Here are some ideas on how to incorporate them into your everyday eating plan.

The Power
Cruciferous vegetables include cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, turnips, kale, and Brussels sprouts. These superstar veggies are packed with so many nutrients it’s tough to keep count. They contain fiber,vitamins A and Criboflavin, B6, folic acid, magnesium, potassium and omega-3 fats. What’s more, they also have plant chemicals known as glucosinolates that have been shown to help reduce the risk of various types of cancer.

2011 study in the International Journal of Urology found that the more veggies that were eaten from the cabbage family, the lower the risk was from prostate cancer. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, studies also link the various components in cruciferous veggies to helping reduce the risk of colorectal, esophageal, stomach, mouth and pancreatic cancer.

Brussels Sprouts
These green jewels can be broiled, roasted or steamed – or sliced and sautéed like in the recipe below. If you’re not familiar with cooking these babies, check out our recent post.

Recipe: Brussels Sprouts Hash

Broccoli
Studies show that cooking broccoli may enhance its cancer-fighting properties. Keep a bag in the freezer and toss into pasta, soups, stews, stir-fry and rice dishes. Find out why broccoli is one of ourtop 10 superfoods.

Recipe: Broccoli, Mushroom and Cheese Breakfast Strata

Kale
There are many varieties of this leafy veggie including Dinosaur (a.k.a. Cavolo Nero), Curly, and Plain Leaved. If using raw in a salad, don’t chop or tear until you’re ready to use it in order to preserve the vitamin C.

Recipe: Kale Chips

Cabbage
Green or red, cabbage contains a plethora of nutrients. Red cabbage also contains anthocyanins, a potent anti-inflammatory antioxidant.

Recipe: Braised Red Cabbage and Turnips

Cauliflower
Although peak season is September through November, you can still find cauliflower in your frozen food aisle; look for brands without added butter or sauces.

Recipe: Oven-Roasted Cauliflower With Turmeric and Ginger

Bok Choy
Add this green veggie to soups or stir-fry. Raw bok choy adds a sweet crunch to salads and sandwiches too.

Recipe: Wilted Bok Choy With Soy Sauce and Cashews

TELL US: Which cruciferous veggies will you be cooking today?

Toby Amidor, MS, RD, CDN, is a registered dietitian and consultant who specializes in food safety and culinary nutrition. See Toby’s full bio »

reprinted from:  http://blog.foodnetwork.com/healthyeats/2012/02/04/cancer-prevention-cruciferous-veggies/

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